A Petition Is Trying To Get Rid Of One Of CFB’s Most Iconic Mascots

first_imgA wide-action shot of the crowd at an LSU game.BATON ROUGE, LA – SEPTEMBER 19: Fans watch during the game between the Louisiana State University Tigers and the University of Louisiana-Lafatette Ragin’ Cajuns at Tiger Stadium on September 19, 2009 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)A petition is attempting to get rid of one of college football’s most iconic mascots.The petition, which was started by Care2, a California-based social media operation with 40 million members, has 35,000-plus signatures.The group is calling for LSU to get rid of its live tiger mascot. The Tigers have had multiple “Mike the Tigers” over the years.“We believe that animals shouldn’t be used as entertainment, they aren’t here for our amusement,” said Rebecca Gerber of Care2.From The Advocate:Though LSU has spent millions improving the mascot’s enclosure, Gerber said Wednesday the point is that having a wild animal on campus as a tourist attraction makes it easier for people to accept killing animals for consumer trifles, which is the most likely end for tigers bred in captivity.“They should be in the wild and respected,” she said. “Even treated very kindly, it’s easier to see them as here entertainment, disposable props for football … We’re trying to stop that message completely.”This isn’t Care2’s first stab at petitioning LSU on behalf of Mike VII. Soon after Mike VI died of cancer, the group gathered 142,000 signatures asking LSU not to replace him with a new tiger. In comparison, the petition asking to create the City of St. George had about 13,000 signatures in June.LSU never responded.LSU has reportedly responded with the following statement:“The university does not support the for-profit breeding of tigers. By providing a home for a tiger that needs one, LSU hopes to raise awareness about the problem of irresponsible breeding and the plight of tigers kept illegally and/or inappropriately in captivity in the U.S.”Happy second birthday to our favorite tiger in the world – @MikeTheTiger! ?? pic.twitter.com/ZVKSR4GNtj— LSU (@LSU) September 13, 2018You can view the full report here.last_img read more

Stock up on your maple syrup El Nino could spell a bad

MONTREAL • A late spring caused Canada’s maple syrup production to fall for the second consecutive year in 2015 — and El Nino is threatening to put a dent in next spring’s output as well.The warmer El Nino weather is expected to have an impact on a number of commodities, including maple sap, said Sylvain Charlebois, professor of distribution and food policy at the University of Guelph’s Food Institute.“I see little evidence that would encourage anyone to see a good year in 2016,” he said in an interview.The impact would hit Quebec, the world’s dominant maple syrup producer, along with Ontario, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and syrup-producing U.S. states like Vermont and New York.Producers on both sides of the border aren’t yet ready, however, to throw in the towel.How a maple syrup rebellion is growing in QuebecHow TPP could make things sticky for Quebec’s maple syrup producersThe Federation of Quebec Maple Syrup Producers says it’s too soon to know what impact warmer conditions could have next spring.“Nobody can predict the production of each year,” said federation deputy director Paul Rouillard.He also doubts that weather poses a long-term problem for Quebec, because colder parts of the province could — over several decades — pick up the slack from more affected regions. Quebec’s federation, representing about 7,300 producers, is seeking approval to add 2.5 million taps to the 43 million already active each year.Quebec’s supply management system keeps syrup prices high by using its strategic reserve — which contains 60 million pounds — to balance production fluctuations.A shorter season also affected U.S. maple production last year but it’s premature to forecast weather problems several months ahead, said Matthew Gordon, executive director of the Vermont Maple Sugar Makers Association.“It certainly could have an impact, but I wouldn’t base any business decisions on it right now,” he said.Gordon said although El Nino affects winter weather, it tends to have less impact on spring’s oscillating temperatures of freezing nights and thawing days that are crucial for maple production.Canadian maple production decreased 6.1 per cent to 8.9 million gallons last season, said Statistics Canada.The value of maple production was $358 million, down from $380 million in 2014 and the $408 million peak in 2013.Quebec remained the country’s largest producer, accounting for more than 90 per cent of national output. However, its production decreased 5.8 per cent from 2014, StatsCan said Wednesday.Poor weather in parts of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia also hurt production in Canada’s third and fourth-largest maple producing provinces after Ontario, which was stable.Despite lower production, maple syrup sales and exports have steadily increased over the past five years, said Rouillard.Quebec export volumes to the U.S. increased last year even though new American production caused the province’s U.S. market share to drop to about 72 per cent.Quebec producers also spend about $5 million annually to develop new maple products and to expand exports to markets in Europe, Asia and Australia.The weaker loonie is expected to give Canadian sales a jolt as exported syrup becomes cheaper.Gordon said U.S. bottlers that aren’t marketing their state-produced syrup will look to purchase lower priced bulk Canadian syrup. That could be a disincentive for American producers to continue to add more taps.The Canadian Press read more