NTT DATA Canada Inc Creates HighValue Jobs in Nova Scotia

first_imgIT services firm NTT DATA Canada, Inc., formerly Keane Canada, Inc., will create as many as 250 new jobs in Halifax over the next five years. Keane International, Inc. and its subsidiaries, including Keane Canada, Inc., were purchased by NTT DATA Corporation in January 2011. This leading, global IT services company employs 57,000 professionals in more than 35 countries and is owned by Japan’s largest telephone company, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation. The Keane Canada, Inc. head office has been operating in Halifax for 15 years and, now as NTT DATA Canada, Inc., will expand its diverse group of more than 400 employees. The company is diversifying its client base, focusing on major clients in Canada and the United States. “As part of jobsHere, NTT DATA and the province are working together to grow the private-sector and create high-value, high-paying jobs,” said acting Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism John MacDonell. “This growth demonstrates Nova Scotia’s appeal and ideal location for global IT companies.” A $3,463,688 payroll rebate from the province, through Nova Scotia Business Inc., will support the Halifax expansion. The company will reinvest in training and recruitment programs and increase its employment base by up to 250 positions over the five-year term of the rebate. The company’s former payroll rebate, announced in 2008, was not used because of the global recession and its impact on IT budgets, and global outsourcing. The rebate, which included a corresponding training incentive from Economic and Rural Development and Tourism for a combined total of $6,046,263, has been cancelled. “We are excited to be renewing our growth plans in Nova Scotia,” said John MacIntosh, vice-president, Global Client Management with NTT DATA. “We have had great success in attracting talented and loyal employees in Halifax; when it came time to choose a location to grow – Nova Scotia came out on top.” NTT DATA offers innovative business and IT solutions. The company focuses on consulting, managed services, projects, outsourcing and cloud-based solutions to mid-size and large enterprises in all major industries. “We are topping our competitors by attracting multinational companies to Nova Scotia, while also benefiting from their growth,” said Nova Scotia Business Inc. president and CEO Stephen Lund. ‘Securing NTT DATA’s growth in Halifax helps demonstrate that our province is a cost-effective place to do business and a world-class centre for IT.” Nova Scotia Business Inc. is the province’s private-sector-led business development agency. Through trade development, investment attraction, business financing and venture capital, NSBI assists local companies and attracts international companies to Nova Scotia. For more information, visit www.nsbi.ca and follow online at www.nsbi.ca/connect .last_img read more

CBK bewildered by MRs policies

“Relations with India are essential and crucial,” she stresses.Which leads her to wonder, after New Delhi’s recent United Nations vote against Sri Lanka, what has changed there. Two years ago, in similar circumstances, India actually canvassed on Lanka’s behalf.“Somethings must have changed,” she says.“I do not know what they are.” Kumaratunga strongly denies she backed the rival candidate, General Sarath Fonseka. “Normally I would have supported Rajapaksa: I am still patron and member of our party. But I could not support some of his policies.” So she stayed out of the campaign altogether. “Such opportunities do not last forever,” she warned. “That is why they are called windows and not something larger.”SAPRI will look at issues regarding the subcontinent, Kumaratunga says, engaging research scholars globally on these topics.  These deliberations will result in policy recommendations which will be communicated to policy-makers and professionals. Kumaratunga said that Sri Lanka has a “marvellous opportunity” to heal and reconcile its twin populations after 25 years of civil war and she is more than a little baffled at the slowness with which the Mahinda Rajapaksa government is building post-civil war “bridges.” Former President Chandrika Kumaratunga says she is bewildered by President Mahinda Rajapaksa’s foreign policy.In New Delhi for the first annual conference of her own South Asia Policy and Research Institute (SAPRI), Kumaratunga also denied she backed Sarath Fonseka at the last Presidential election, the Hindustan Times reported. If she is concerned at Rajapaksa’s minority policies, she is “bewildered” by his foreign policy.“In my time, we practiced nonalignment, which meant keeping good relations with the entire world,” she says.This led many Western countries to agree to ban or limit the activities of the Tamil Tigers. Kumaratunga is clearly discomfited with Rajapaksa’s confrontational policies with the West and his rhetorical claims to having new “friends” in China, Myanmar and Iran. Sri Lanka is still fertile ground for the dissemination of such ideas. While the civil war has seen some repair work accomplished, Kumaratunga says still more needs to be done in terms of physical reconstruction and rehabilitation.Kumaratunga led Lanka during some of the bloodiest years of the civil war. Today, with a Tamil minority “who want rights but of whom only a small minority still talk of a homeland,” she seems worried Colombo doesn’t recognize what a good thing it has going for it.Rajapaksa’s abrogation of her promise of Tamil political devolution – a decision he had been party to at the time and did not oppose – was one reason Kumaratunga declined to support him in the last elections.  “Even though he called me eight times asking for support,” she remembers. read more