Woman brutally attacked after husband approached gang drinking outside their home

first_imgA man who trains horses for some of the top breeders in the country has pleaded guilty to a vicious attack on a woman in Raphoe.Jonathan Porter, who is originally from Lifford, threw the defenceless woman over a wooden fence at Meadowhill before kicking her twice in the stomach and then punching her in the face. And Mrs Marian McConnell’s only crime was that she complained about Porter and two other men making noise outside her home.Father of one Porter, who is now 27, pleaded guilty to a Section 3 assault on Mrs McConnell and her husband Neil.Letterkenny Circuit Court heard how Mr McConnell was watching television with his wife when he heard a noise outside just after midnight.He saw three males outside and when he went to the front gate of his house, he was set upon by at least two of the men.One of the men kicked him in the privates while Porter then punched him in the head.Both men took turns to swig on a bottle of whiskey while they assaulted Mr McConnell.When Mrs McConnell emerged from her house, Porter launched a vicious attack on her.After assaulting her her said to her “Get back or you’ll get the same.”The men fled when the third men said the Gardai were coming.Porter’s barrister Ms Fiona Crawford said her client admitted that he was a drunken mess on the night and was ashamed of what had happened.He had been shunned by his family and his mother did not speak to him for several months after the horrific attack.She said however that since the incident four years ago, Porter had moved away and was not heavily involved in the training of horses at a high level.He worked on a number of stud farms and broke horses for a number of top horse owners including Prince Khalid bin Abdullah of Saudi Arabia of Juddmonte Farms.He was now living in Kilmacourt Woods in Portarlington, Co Laois and has a partner and young daughter.Judge Martin Nolan called the attack as vicious and said there was no question Mr and Mrs McConnell suffered serious injuries.Judge Nolan said he wanted to remand the accused man in custody until next Tuesday when he will pass sentence.Woman brutally attacked after husband approached gang drinking outside their home was last modified: February 2nd, 2017 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:attackcourtdonegalJonathon POrterLiffordRaphoelast_img read more

Stem Cell Headlines

first_img1Quesenberry et al., “Ignoratio Elenchi: Red Herrings in Stem Cell Research,” Science, Vol 308, Issue 5725, 1121-1122, 20 May 2005, [DOI: 10.1126/science.1104432].2Gretchen Vogel, “Korean Team Speeds Up Creation Of Cloned Human Stem Cells,” Science, Vol 308, Issue 5725, 1096-1097, 20 May 2005, [DOI: 10.1126/science.308.5725.1096].3Magnus and Cho, “Issues in Oocyte Donation for Stem Cell Research,” Science, published online 19 May 2005, [DOI: 10.1126/science.1114454].4Erika Check, “Korea’s accelerating stem-cell work prompts calls for global ethical rules,” Nature 435, 393 (26 May 2005) | doi: 10.1038/435393a.Our 02/08/2005 commentary still stands, and now we are in the thick of the ethical morass we knew was coming.  Bioethical voices seem powerless over the lure of money and prestige.  Erika Check quoted Caplan describing ethicists as standing on the sidelines and pouting, “you can’t do this.”  But would international controls help?  The U.N. with its Oil-for-Food scandal showed that international agencies are no guarantors of ethics: they can become the problem, not the solution.  Nor has the U.N. been willing or able to stop human rights violations in rogue nations like North Korea or Sudan.  It is doubtful an international science community would have any power over rogue nations and individuals now that stem cell research is hot.  We have seen that there are researchers within the civilized world with no qualms about trying anything that is possible, even putting human cells into rat brains (see 03/10/2005 entry).  In today’s amoral, selfish research culture, it seems as if the tables have turned: rat cells have invaded the human brain.(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Research on embryonic stem cells is proceeding apace without an ethical anchor, and no clue where it will lead.  News coverage of the debate accelerated with an announcement from South Korea.Match point:  The BBC News and many other news sources published South Korea’s announcement that stem cells matched to the individual have been tailored for the first time.First clone:  The BBC News also announced that the UK had made its first human cloned embryo for harvesting stem cells.  The article quotes a ProLife alliance representative appalled over this; “No matter how it is created,” Josephine Quintavalle said, “a human embryo’s destiny should be to live and not to be turned into human stem cells.”  She also protested the “unsafe and inefficient” practice, and how it might subject women to dangerous fertility drugs in order to collect sufficient eggs.  Proponents agree that embryonic stem cell therapies only exist in theory; one professor said, “We are talking about several years before we are talking about a cell-based therapy that can go back into the patient.”Contradictory results:  Science last week1 tried to clarify contradictory lab results by explaining “red herrings in stem cell research.”  They identified eight factors influencing stem cell plasticity, especially injury to the cells during lab procedure.Korea and Ethics:  Gretchen Vogel in Science2 elaborated on South Korea’s widely-reported advance in the efficiency of deriving stem cells from cloned human embryos.  They got the success rate down from one in 200 to one in 20.  The improved skills of the Korean group nevertheless raise difficult ethical questions,” she says, referring to a Stanford bioethics statement in the same issue that warns, “research proceeds internationally, these issues must be adequately addressed for public confidence to be maintained.”3  Ethic problems include demand among scientists for fresh oocytes from young women, medical complications, long term complications, and chances that renegade doctors will attempt reproductive cloning.Presidential angst:  President Bush said he was “very concerned” about Korea’s rapid advances in stem cell research, and said he would veto any bill loosening restrictions on federal funding for it.  See report on MSNBC News.  Although the research is not “banned” in the United States, federal funding is restricted.  Bush said he worries about a “world in which cloning becomes accepted,” and does not believe taxpayer money should “promote science which destroys life in order to save life.”Political battle:  MSNBC also reported that a heated debate is brewing between Congress and the President over a bill proposed by a Republican from Delaware and a Democrat from Colorado to ease restrictions on federal funding of stem cell research.  Advocates are emphasizing promised cures “with emotional appeals from celebrity supporters as well as parents who ‘adopted’ their children as embryos,”  the article begins.  Supporters and opponents are deeply divided over whether the embryos are human beings.International tensions:  Nigel Williams in Current Biology4 surveys the international scene, particularly in Europe where the EU has member states that stand “poles apart” on the issue.  He contrasts Switzerland’s liberal policy with Italy’s stern opposition due largely to the Catholic church.International standards:  In Nature May 26,4 Erika Check suggested that nations need to pull together to decide what’s right.  Quoting Arthur Caplan, bioethicist at U. of Pennsylvania, “An international effort to coordinate stem-cell research would lend transparency to the field and ensure it proceeds in an ethical way.” Insufficient guidelines:  Nathaniel Nelson and Bert Thompson on Apologetics Press examined the NAS guidelines for embryonic stem cell research and found them “largely insufficient in dealing with the ethical stipulations” raised by the technology.last_img read more

Believe we can win IPL 2019: Delhi Capitals captain Shreyas Iyer

first_imgHaving jumped to the second spot after beating Sunrisers Hyderabad by 39 runs, Delhi Capitals captain Shreyas Iyer Sunday said that his team is believing it can win the IPL title this time.”We are believing so and it’s never too far,” Iyer said when asked if he thinks his side can win the IPL.Talking about the partnership he had with Rishabh Pant in Delhi Capitals’ innings, Iyer, who scored 45, said, “It started to slow down. Me and Pant had decided so that one of us will take the charge.”Iyer’s 56-run partnership with Pant (23) for the fourth wicket took Delhi to a challenging total of 155 for 7 after being invited to bat.”We got a little cameo from Keemo and Axar and helped us get to that total,” he said.Asked about the composition of the team, he said, “We have played together (Rabada and himself during U-19 days). It is good to be around each other. It is easy to have that camaraderie.”It is a positive thing to carry around. We are positive as well when we chase. We will be backing our abilities.”Rabada, Paul delighted after decimating SRHRabada, who took four wickets for 22 runs, said, “We have our game plans and all that we try to do is to stick to it. We hope it goes our way and more often than not, it should go your way.”It’s been the trend so far, you need to have variety in your pace. We try to talk about change-ups especially if wickets are assisting those type of changes. It worked for us today. In many ways, you do have a responsibility as an overseas player. We are working on all the departments and it’s working well for us.”advertisementMan-of-the-match for his 3/17, pacer Keemo Paul said, “This is a dream come true for me. It is the biggest league in the world and why not enjoy it. Went back of the hand and it worked for me. I just tried to adapt to the wicket, just bowled to suit the wicket. The slower balls were gripping.”This game is all about confidence. I have not been getting much to contribute with the bat so wanted to contribute more.”Delhi adapted well to the surface: Kane WilliamsonA disappointed Sunrisers captain Kane Williamson said, “I thought the first half with the ball was a really good effort. It was a bare surface, probably a 160 surface. We tried in the second half but never got going with partnerships. Unfortunate performance but credit to Delhi the way they played.”There was never any complacency in a tournament like this. Any team on the table can beat anybody. For us, it’s about executing our plans and play our style of cricket. It’s one of those things. The two at the top of the order have been prolific. Delhi adapted well on this surface and used their changes of pace.”Also Read | Dhawan, Ishant dance like there’s no tomorrow after DC move to 2nd spotlast_img read more