Dryden’s 50th space shuttle landing is honored by group

first_imgEDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE – California space advocates will honor the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center for its 50th space shuttle landing and continued support of the nation’s space program. The California Space Authority will present Dryden with a SpotBeam award at a banquet on Dec. 2 in Los Angeles. The award recognizes the center for supporting the Aug. 9 landing of the space shuttle Discovery, the latest in a long line of space efforts by the center. “This was the nation’s ‘return-to-flight’,” said Janice Dunn, CSA’s deputy director. “It was a major accomplishment.” The Edwards Air Force Base landing capped a two-week mission that was the first shuttle flight since the loss of Columbia on Feb. 1, 2003. Discovery was to have landed in Florida, but poor weather prompted NASA to direct the shuttle to Edwards. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals NASA prefers to land the shuttles in Florida because it saves about $1 million in costs for ferrying an orbiter cross-country, plus it reduces the amount of handling of the spacecraft. However, about one out of every five missions ends at Edwards. The award recognizes Dryden’s work that dates back to the 1960s. The 1960s work included the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle, which supported the Apollo moon missions, and the X-15 rocket planes that tested a number of space-related technologies, including the first use of a full-pressure suit for space flight, the first use of a reaction control system for maneuvering in space, and the development of thermal protection for hypersonic re-entry. The award also recognizes a number of efforts that supported the space shuttle, including the lifting body craft that gave NASA confidence to land the shuttles unpowered; working testing flight control systems used by the orbiter; the approach and landing tests of the space shuttle prototype Enterprise; and tests on thermal protection systems. “NASA Dryden Flight Research Center will continue to contribute to the space program by serving as a potential landing site for the Crew Exploration Vehicle,” CSA said in its tribute to Dryden. “The infrastructure at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center is likely to play a key role in carrying out the bold objectives set by the vision for space exploration.” This is the second year for CSA’s SpotBeam award. Last year, recipients included two from the Antelope Valley – the late state Sen. W.J. “Pete” Knight, R-Palmdale, for his advocacy of space and the military, and the SpaceShipOne team, which made the first private, manned space flights. The other SpotBeam recipients this year are Rep. Ken Calvert, R-Riverside; the California Council on Base Support and Retention; the late Assemblyman Mike Gordon, D-El Segundo; the Los Angeles Air Force Base Regional Alliance; the Chabot Space and Science Center; Lockheed Martin’s work force; the Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Trimble Navigation LTD.; and QuakeFinder LLC. Jim Skeen, (661) 267-5743 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Gift that keeps on giving

first_imgTo teach a child to read is to equip her with the tools for success in life.(Image: help2read)Lorraine KearneyLiteracy is key: if you can read, you can make something of yourself.“Literacy can break the cycle of poverty,” stresses Marco Andolfi, the business development manager of Cape Town-based non-profit Section 21 company help2read.The flipside is that if you cannot read, you are trapped – unemployed and unemployable, or stuck in a low-paid, unskilled job.With this in mind, help2read has designed a model that targets primary school children in under-resourced schools.“help2read is an organisation set up to promote child literacy across South Africa,” Andolfi explains. “We recruit and train local volunteers to help children in primary schools – mostly in grade three – to learn to read.”There are approximately five-million illiterate people in South Africa. And schools are not necessarily helping to lower this number: according to the 2006 Pirls report, South African schoolchildren are three to five years behind their international counterparts.Pirls, the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study, is run by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement, an independent, international cooperative of national research institutions and governmental research agencies. First conducted in 2001, Pirls reports every five years on the reading achievement of fourth grade children worldwide.“The problem is that most South African children come from a culture of non-reading,” says Andolfi, “and this is added to poorly resourced schools.”There are no books at home; children don’t see or listen to their parents reading; they are seldom, if ever, taken to a library; their schools frequently do not have libraries.How it workshelp2read places volunteers, each armed with a well-stocked book box, into participating schools. There are coordinator teachers at these schools who identify the pupils most in need. The volunteers then work one-on-one with these children, 30 minutes a week, for a year.In total, each volunteer spends two hours a week at their school. The long-term nature of the intervention helps to build strong relationships of trust between the child and the volunteer, as well as build the child’s self-confidence.“We have 686 volunteers working in our schools in Western Cape and Gauteng. It is unpaid work, and many of them are unemployed. It’s also a skills development project. We hold regular workshops for our volunteers, and they learn skills that will help them in finding work.”Some volunteers are employed and come in before work; others are retired people. Each volunteer is strictly vetted, with proper police clearances carried out, before they are trained. Only once this is done are they placed in schools.Of the volunteers, 52% are unemployed and live in disadvantaged areas. They often volunteer as a means of participating in meaningful activities that enhance their own skills and self-esteem. Women make up 93% of the volunteers.It seems to be working. “In 2011 we had assessments that found that after six months on our programme, learning improved by 14 months.” This brings the children up to speed.Although this school outreach is the core of help2read’s work, it also has other projects to promote literacy, such as Reading Adventures, which run at local libraries.“We use puppet shows and other activities to spread the love for reading. We are also now undertaking a youth librarian training project together with Equal Education.”Such partnerships are an engine of growth, Andolfi says, emphasising that there is room for more, particularly with the education ministry. It has also recently expanded into Namibia, teaming up with the Michelle McLean Children Trust. Numbers are growinghelp2Read started as a pilot project in 2005 at Muizenberg Primary School, on the Cape Peninsula. It now works in about 90 schools in the Western Cape, with about 1 250 children. It also expanded into Gauteng in 2011, where it works in 15 schools and helps 250 pupils.“In the long run, our major goal is to be in rural areas, especially in Limpopo, Mpumalanga and Eastern Cape [where the need is greatest],” says Andolfi. “We must create skills in the areas where people live so that they can make a life there, and are not forced to migrate.”The mission, according to the group, is to “motivate the literate adult population in South Africa to pass on their skills to the next generation, helping children to become confident readers. The key to the future of help2read is the recruitment and development of volunteers from underprivileged communities”.Andolfi explains: “We try to train people to help themselves.” He points out that help2read is not a charity but is a developmental organisation. It’s the old story of teaching a person to fish rather than giving him a fish.Of course, the need is great. Volunteers and cash are constantly in demand. Corporates can help through donations, and individuals can also make donations – for just R100 a month, for example, you can sponsor a child to learn to read for a year. For R25 000, a company can sponsor an entire school.Donations and sponsorships are also used to get books. They come from publishing houses, which donate or give an NGO discount; through the US group Books for Africa; and from individuals.Books used in the programme are age-appropriate and in line with school requirements. Donated books that don’t fit this profile are sold back to the public. The cash raised through these book sales and other fundraising activities is poured right back into the literacy programme.The organisation is holding its annual fundraising dinner in Cape Town on 20 November.Description: Help2read works in schoolsMetatags: help2read, read, education, literacy, illiterate, volunteer, school, library, learner, book, MediaClub, Play Your Part, Brand South Africa, Brand SA, official siteGift that keeps on givingTeaching a child to read is a priceless gift. The world opens when you can read, and your prospects improve – a better job, a better life. The help2read organisation gives this gift to South African children.Lorraine KearneyLiteracy is key: if you can read, you can make something of yourself. “Literacy can break the cycle of poverty,” stresses Marco Andolfi, the business development manager of Cape Town-based non-profit Section 21 company help2read. The flipside is that if you cannot read, you are trapped – unemployed and unemployable, or stuck in a low-paid, unskilled job.With this in mind, help2read has designed a model that targets primary school children in under-resourced schools. “help2read is an organisation set up to promote child literacy across South Africa,” Andolfi explains. “We recruit and train local volunteers to help children in primary schools – mostly in grade three – to learn to read.”There are approximately five-million illiterate people in South Africa. And schools are not necessarily helping to lower these rates: according to the 2006 Pirls report, South African schoolchildren are three to five years behind their international counterparts. Pirls, the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study, is run by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement, an independent, international cooperative of national research institutions and governmental research agencies. First conducted in 2001, Pirls reports every five years on the reading achievement of fourth grade children worldwide.“The problem is that most South African children come from a culture of non-reading,” says Andolfi, “and this is added to poorly resourced schools.” There are no books at home; they don’t see or listen to their parents reading; they are not often, if ever, taken to a library; their schools frequently do not have libraries.How it workshelp2read places volunteers, each armed with a well-stocked book box, into participating schools. There are coordinator teachers at these schools who identify the pupils most in need. The volunteers then work one-on-one with these children, 30 minutes a week, for a year. In total, each volunteer spends two hours a week at their school. The long-term nature of the intervention helps to build strong relationships of trust between the child and the volunteer, as well as build the child’s self-confidence.“We have 686 volunteers working in our schools in Western Cape and Gauteng. It is unpaid work, and many of them are unemployed. It’s also a skills development project. We hold regular workshops for our volunteers, and they learn skills that will help them in finding work.”Some volunteers are employed and come in before work; others are retired people. Each volunteer is strictly vetted, with proper police clearances carried out, before they are trained. Only once this is done are they placed in schools. Of the volunteers, 52% are unemployed and live in disadvantaged areas. They often volunteer as a means of participating in meaningful activities that enhance their own skills and self-esteem. Women make up 93% of the volunteers.It seems to be working. “In 2011 we had assessments that found that after six months on our programme, learning improved by 14 months.” This brings the children up to speed.Although this school outreach is the core of help2read’s work, it also has other projects to promote literacy, such as Reading Adventures, which run at local libraries. “We use puppet shows and other activities to spread the love for reading. We are also now undertaking a youth librarian training project together with Equal Education.” Such partnerships are an engine of growth, Andolfi says, emphasising that there is room for more, particularly with the education ministry. It has also recently expanded into Namibia, teaming up with the Michelle McLean Children Trust.Numbers are growinghelp2Read started as a pilot project in 2005 at Muizenberg Primary School, on the Cape Peninsula. It now works in about 90 schools in the Western Cape, with about 1 250 children. It also expanded into Gauteng in 2011, where it works in 15 schools and helps 250 pupils. “In the long run, our major goal is to be in rural areas, especially in Limpopo, Mpumalanga and Eastern Cape [where the need is greatest],” says Andolfi. “We must create skills in the areas where people live so that they can make a life there, and are not forced to migrate.”The mission, according to the group, is to “motivate the literate adult population in South Africa to pass on their skills to the next generation, helping children to become confident readers. The key to the future of help2read is the recruitment and development of volunteers from underprivileged communities”.Andolfi explains: “We try to train people to help themselves.” He points out that help2read is not a charity but is a developmental organisation. It’s the old story of teaching a person to fish rather than giving him a fish.Of course, the need is great. Volunteers and cash are constantly in demand. Corporates can help through donations, and individuals can also make donations – for just R100 a month, for example, you can sponsor a child to learn to read for a year. For R25 000, a company can sponsor an entire school. Donations and sponsorships are also used to get books. They come from publishing houses, which donate or give an NGO discount; through the US group Books for Africa; and from individuals. Books used in the programme are age-appropriate and in line with school requirements. Donated books that don’t fit this profile are sold back to the public. The cash raised through these book sales and other fundraising activities is poured right back into the literacy programme.The organisation is holding its annual fundraising dinner in Cape Town on 20 November.Contact:Marco Andolfi, business development managerTel: +27 (0)21 685 8085Fax: +27 (0)86 511 2399last_img read more

You, Advisor.

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now In order to help your clients to achieve the success they desire, and in order to achieve the success you desire, you need to be more than a sales person. You need to be an advisor.What questions should your dream client be asking themselves about what they need to do to improve their existing performance?You need to know what questions your dream client should be asking themselves so that you can establish yourself as a business person and someone who has the potential to advise them.What questions should your dream client be challenging the people on their team to help them answer?Leaders want to challenge their teams to take on new initiatives that generate greater results. Knowing these questions helps you to begin the process of building consensus, and creating a vision.What are the three or four potential threats to your prospective client’s business now, and what should they be doing about them?No one wants to be surprised because they didn’t recognize a threat before it was too late. Being able to see around corners is one way you create value for your client.What are the two or three opportunities that your prospect should be pursuing now, and why should they consider these opportunities?If you were a good general manager, what would you see as opportunities? That’s the role you are advising, so you need to look through that lens.What is your dream client doing now that no longer make sense or has been made obsolete (or should be)?Sometimes improvement means you discontinue doing something you are doing now. What is that?What threatens your prospect’s existing business model?Business models need to change when circumstances change. Circumstances have changed. What needs to change?What should their vision of their future include and why? What should it omit?How can you help lead your client to to the future if you can’t see it yourself? If you want to advise, you need to advice.What is your view on all of these questions? What is your opinion as to what your dream client should be focusing on now?last_img read more

Video: Notre Dame’s C.J. Prosise Busts A 91-Yard Touchdown Run To Seal Big Win Over Georgia Tech

first_imgNotre Dame runs onto the field ahead of a game vs. Wake Forest.SOUTH BEND, IN – NOVEMBER 04: The macot, cheerleaders and players forthe Notre Dame Fighting Irish run onto the field before a game against the Wake Forest Demon Deacons at Notre Dame Stadium on November 4, 2017 in South Bend, Indiana. Notre Dame defeated Wake Forest 48-37. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)Georgia Tech, one of the ACC favorites, went to South Bend as three point favorites over a Notre Dame team reeling from the injury to quarterback Malik Zaire, and the result was pretty shocking. The Irish wound up blowing out the Yellow Jackets, and running back C.J. Prosise put the exclamation point on things, busting a 91-yard touchdown run through the heart of the Tech defense to make the lead 30-7.CJ Prosise 91 yard run pic.twitter.com/nCPbvk9G3z— THE MAIN MANN™ (@JacobMann_1) September 19, 2015How do our guys celebrate a 198-yard, 3 TD rushing performance from CJ Prosise? Take a look: pic.twitter.com/ekdyANzYxC— Notre Dame Football (@NDFootball) September 19, 2015Late in the fourth quarter, Prosise has 198 yards and three touchdowns on the day. Prosise is filling in for the injured Tarean Folston, who went down in the season opener. He certainly looks the part thus far.last_img read more

Video: Draymond Green Says If He Could Hit Someone With A Snowball, It’d Be A Michigan Fan

first_imgDraymond Green being interviewed.draymond green snowball michigan fanThursday, Nike released a new two-minute commercial dedicated to “Snow Days” which features over a dozen of the brand’s professional athletes lining up against each other on the football field. One of those athletes is former Michigan State star Draymond Green, who now plays for the Golden State Warriors.Nike also released a “Behind The Scenes” look at the commercial, and asked a few of the athletes who they’d hit with a snowball, given the chance. Green’s answer? A University of Michigan fan. Check it out:This isn’t the first time Green has expressed his dislike for the Wolverines. If you’re interested, here’s the actual commercial – it’s actually very cool.last_img

Sanes attitude cost him World Cup spot with Germany

first_imgGermany boss Joachim Low omitted Leroy Sane from his final 23-man squad for the World Cup due to concerns over his attitude, claims The SunThe German winger played an integral part of Manchester City’s domination in English football this season as Pep Guardiola’s side claimed a domestic double in breathtaking fashion.Sane’s performances over the course of the campaign had seen being awarded the PFA Young Player of the Year ahead of what was expected to be his maiden World Cup appearance.Top 5 Bundesliga players to watch during the weekend Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 11, 2019 With the international activity cooling down for the next month, we go back to the Bundesliga’s Top 5 players to watch next weekend.The German…However, the 22-year-old was shockingly dropped in favour of Bayer Leverkusen winger Julian Brandt with reports now emerging that his attitude during Germany’s World Cup preparations were what ultimately cost him a place in the squad.After Sane’s poor display in Germany’s shock 2-1 defeat to Austria at the weekend, Low was reportedly fearful that he may upset some of the other players if he had decided to select him for Russia.Sane scored 10 league goals and had 15 assists in City’s dominant title-winning campaign, but has yet to find the back of the net for Germany in his 12 appearances.last_img read more

Chemists make thermoset polymer using amine and triketone that is recyclable

first_imgThe researchers then tested their technique in conditions with other materials in the resultant polymer, such as fiberglass or flame retardants. They report that such additives did not prevent the recovery of the monomers or contaminate the new thermosets that were made from them. They also note that much more testing of their technique is required to make sure the thermosets are safe to use and that they do not create other environmental problems. Unlike conventional plastics, the monomers of PDK plastic could be recovered and freed from any compounded additives simply by dunking the material in a highly acidic solution. Credit: Peter Christensen et al./Berkeley Lab More information: Peter R. Christensen et al. Closed-loop recycling of plastics enabled by dynamic covalent diketoenamine bonds, Nature Chemistry (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41557-019-0249-2Press release A team of researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has devised a way to make a type of recyclable thermoset plastic. In their paper published in the journal Nature Chemistry, the group describes combining two particular types of monomers to form a common type of polymer that can be recycled using an acid. Coralie Jehanno and Haritz Sardon with the University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU have published a News and Views piece outlining the work by the team in California in the same journal issue. © 2019 Science X Network Citation: Chemists make thermoset polymer using amine and triketone that is recyclable (2019, April 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-chemists-thermoset-polymer-amine-triketone.html Reversible, dynamic covalent diketoenamine bonds. Diketoenamine bonds form spontaneously from triketones and both aromatic and aliphatic amines. Under strongly acidic conditions in water, the diketoenamine bond hydrolyses to the triketone and an ammonium salt. Credit: Nature Chemistry (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41557-019-0249-2center_img A new class of recyclable thermoset plastics Explore further Plastics have become an environmental problem. Companies make them and use them in a wide variety of applications. Other businesses and consumers make use of the plastics and then discard them. But because they do not degrade very rapidly, they are building up in landfills and the ocean. One particular polymer, known as a thermoset, is particularly troublesome because it is widely used and does not recycle easily. In this new effort, the researchers report a way to make a type of thermoset that can be broken down into its component parts using an acid and then recycled.To come up with the right ingredients, the researchers looked for monomers they could use in a closed-loop cycle (in which the monomer building blocks are recovered) as part of recycling. They finally landed on the monomers amine and triketone. The researchers found they could use them to make a thermoset polymer simply by grinding the two together. Further work showed that if the polymer was soaked in a strong acid for 12 hours, the diketoenamine bonding network would release its bonds, separating the monomers. Next, they found the monomers could be separated and collected using an operationally simple procedure and then reused to make new thermosets that were nearly identical in nature to the original they had made. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Nature Chemistrylast_img read more

Untold story of a freedom fighter

first_imgAs part of Bharat Rang Mahotsav – ongoing theatrical extravaganza in Delhi, a play titled ‘Nine Miles to Go’ will be performed on February 19, 2019. Written by Ujjwal Chattopadhyay and directed by Jayasree Bhattacharya, an hour and 40 minutes long presentation will surely be a treat to watch.The story revolves around a dramatist who wants to write a play on Baghajatin. He is trying to understand Baghajatin’s strategy to fight against 500 British soldiers with only four companions. Was Baghajatin right? The writer appeared to have had an interaction with the soul of Baghajatin who answers all his queries. He explains how Bhagawad Gita and other holy scriptures of our Indian philosophy had defined true leaders. The melodrama begins when the dramatist rewinds the sequences, imagining that the five great fighters have won the battle. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfTalking about this particular play, director Jayasree said, “I believe it as my duty and responsibility to cover a few moments of truth related to a charismatic freedom fighter of India. India’s Freedom did not come all of a sudden. It was an outcome of great sacrifices of our freedom fighters who selflessly fought against the rulers. As a director, I started researching on the subject quite a while ago and discovered many unknown and interesting (sometimes unpleasant) happenings in the life of Baghajatin. I visited all the places where he had lived, worked and sacrificed his life for the country. The more I travelled, the more I was touched. Knowing Baghajatin is a journey and that I have tried to capture in this play Nine Miles to Go.” It will be presented by Pragya Cultural Centre – a Kolkata based theatre group. It works for social causes, and for differently abled people using theatre as a therapy. The group has been performing a popular play Fight Cancer since 2003. It runs theatre workshops for theatre lovers in the eastern zone. It has won several drama competitions and awards.last_img read more