We showed a lot of guts – Roston Chase

first_imgWEST Indies all-rounder Roston Chase called his fighting century on the final day of the series against Pakistan the “toughest” of his career, after he ran out of partners with only one more over to see out a draw in Roseau.He was left unbeaten on 101, his third Test century, when Yasir Shah bowled Shannon Gabriel with the last ball of the penultimate over of the Test.“I wouldn’t say it’s up there with the other two but a century is a century,” Chase said after the match. “We ended up losing the match but this one was the hardest for me. The others were more fluent and the conditions were a lot easier but this one was really tough for me.The pitch was a slower one, you couldn’t play a lot of shots; the outfield was very slow and the bowlers really put the ball in good areas. This one was the toughest out of my few so far.“I thought it was a fighting effort. It’s sad to see that it didn’t mean much in the end because we lost the match but I thought the guys showed a lot of guts and effort not only today but in the whole match. (We) even put ourselves in the chance of, maybe not winning but, at least drawing the series.”Chase recalled how Yasir had dismissed him in three out of six innings in the UAE last year, when he had averaged 22.50 in the three Tests. In this series, Chase was out to Yasir twice in six innings but the batsman said he had found a way to counter the leg-spinner.“I didn’t really do that well in Dubai, so after that series I came home and worked on some of the things that I thought brought my shortfall in Dubai,” Chase said. “Especially Yasir; Shah got the better of me a lot and this was mainly because he was tying me down and then I was just falling to a bad shot because of the pressure.“When I went back home, something I really tried to work on was my sweep shot because that would put him off a little and change up the field and give me a little bit more scoring options.“I thought that really was the key, seeing that he was there all series, so once I got through him it was a little easier for me to play the other bowlers.”Chase’s hundred was not chanceless though. He was dropped twice by the debutant Hasan Ali, and then Mohammad Abbas had him caught in the slips on 92, but replays showed the bowler had overstepped. He was cheered on by the crowd in Roseau.“It’s always good to hear people calling your name,” Chase said. “So many guys are asking me if I’m actually from Dominica. I was always a big fan of the drums, so I love the drums and I love the Dominican fans.”With 403 runs in six innings, Chase finished the series on top of the run-scorers’ list, averaging 100.75 with two centuries and two half-centuries. No other batsman made more than 300.“Even though I’m always a confident guy, it does (add) a lot to see that I average 100 in the series against a quality attack,” he said.“I’m not going to let it get to my head and I’m going to go back home and the next Test series is England, so hopefully I should be there.“I’ll go and look at some footage of the English guys and see what weaknesses they have, what I’ll be looking to exploit and see if that can work. Work hard on those weaknesses so that I can put up some good performances in that series as well.” (ESPN Cricinfo)last_img read more

Tokyo 2020 Olympics: Nigerian Breweries Plc Restates Support for Team Nigeria

first_imgShe further explained that the company is backing Team Nigeria to the Tokyo 2020 Olympic games with two of its leading brands, Amstel Malta and Star Lager, adding that while Amstel Malta is the official Malt drink for Nigerian contingent, Star Lager is the official Lager of Team NigeriaIn his remarks, the Secretary General of the Nigerian Olympic Committee, Mr. Olabanji Olabanjo expressed profound appreciation to Nigerian Breweries Plc for providing the needed impetus through the partnership that is poised to bring excitement and encouragement to all the athletes representing the country.“We are happy to have Nigerian Breweries Plc as our partner. Amstel Malta and Star are brands we are excited to work with to bring this partnership to life for our athletes and the teeming fans,” Olabanjo said.Also speaking at the event, the Marketing Director, Nigerian Breweries Plc, Mr. Emmanuel Oriakhi noted that the partnership with the NOC for the forthcoming 2020 Tokyo Games is part of Nigerian Breweries Plc’s support for sports in Nigeria.“Nigerian Breweries is passionate about sports in Nigeria and we know our consumers love to celebrate great moments in sports. We are thrilled to be able to bring people together to enjoy and celebrate Team Nigeria on their journey to Tokyo 2020 where we believe in our talented athletes to shine,” he said.During his visit, the President of the International Olympic Committee, Mr. Thomas Bach inaugurated the Secretariat of the Association of National Olympic Committees of Africa (ANOCA) in Abuja. He was also taken on a tour of the Moshood Abiola National Stadium where he interacted with Patrons, Olympians, NOC partners as well as current and past Olympic scholarship holders.The Vice President, Federal Republic of Nigeria, Professor Yemi Osinbajo, Minister of Youth and Sports Development, Honourable Sunday Dare, Chairman, Nigerian Breweries Plc, Kolawole Jamodu were among top dignitaries at the dinner.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Nigerian Breweries Plc, Nigeria’s foremost brewing company, has restated its commitment towards the development of sports in Nigeriaas one of the major sponsors of Team Nigeria to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.Speaking during a state house dinner held at Aso Rock Villa, Abuja in honour of the President of the International Olympic Committee, Mr. Thomas Bach who visited Nigeria recently, the Corporate Affairs Director, Nigerian Breweries Plc, Mrs. Sade Morgan stated that the company’s support for the Olympic Team is in continuation of the strong and long term relationship that exists between the company and the Nigerian Olympic Committee (NOC).“As an organisation, Nigerian Breweries is a major partner with NOC and has a long history of supporting projects like this. We do this to show our commitment to the growth of the Nigerian sports sector,” she said.last_img read more

Warriors Live: Five answers about Pelicans, plus in-game updates

first_imgScroll to the bottom of follow our live feed during the game.For the second straight game, the suddenly vulnerable Warriors are on the road facing a winless team. The question is whether Golden State can avoid a repeat of what happened in Oklahoma City on Sunday when it takes on the 0-3 Pelicans in New Orleans Monday night?The Pelicans haven’t won a game yet, but among their losses are an opening night overtime loss in Toronto against the defending NBA champs and Saturday’s …last_img

Gift that keeps on giving

first_imgTo teach a child to read is to equip her with the tools for success in life.(Image: help2read)Lorraine KearneyLiteracy is key: if you can read, you can make something of yourself.“Literacy can break the cycle of poverty,” stresses Marco Andolfi, the business development manager of Cape Town-based non-profit Section 21 company help2read.The flipside is that if you cannot read, you are trapped – unemployed and unemployable, or stuck in a low-paid, unskilled job.With this in mind, help2read has designed a model that targets primary school children in under-resourced schools.“help2read is an organisation set up to promote child literacy across South Africa,” Andolfi explains. “We recruit and train local volunteers to help children in primary schools – mostly in grade three – to learn to read.”There are approximately five-million illiterate people in South Africa. And schools are not necessarily helping to lower this number: according to the 2006 Pirls report, South African schoolchildren are three to five years behind their international counterparts.Pirls, the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study, is run by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement, an independent, international cooperative of national research institutions and governmental research agencies. First conducted in 2001, Pirls reports every five years on the reading achievement of fourth grade children worldwide.“The problem is that most South African children come from a culture of non-reading,” says Andolfi, “and this is added to poorly resourced schools.”There are no books at home; children don’t see or listen to their parents reading; they are seldom, if ever, taken to a library; their schools frequently do not have libraries.How it workshelp2read places volunteers, each armed with a well-stocked book box, into participating schools. There are coordinator teachers at these schools who identify the pupils most in need. The volunteers then work one-on-one with these children, 30 minutes a week, for a year.In total, each volunteer spends two hours a week at their school. The long-term nature of the intervention helps to build strong relationships of trust between the child and the volunteer, as well as build the child’s self-confidence.“We have 686 volunteers working in our schools in Western Cape and Gauteng. It is unpaid work, and many of them are unemployed. It’s also a skills development project. We hold regular workshops for our volunteers, and they learn skills that will help them in finding work.”Some volunteers are employed and come in before work; others are retired people. Each volunteer is strictly vetted, with proper police clearances carried out, before they are trained. Only once this is done are they placed in schools.Of the volunteers, 52% are unemployed and live in disadvantaged areas. They often volunteer as a means of participating in meaningful activities that enhance their own skills and self-esteem. Women make up 93% of the volunteers.It seems to be working. “In 2011 we had assessments that found that after six months on our programme, learning improved by 14 months.” This brings the children up to speed.Although this school outreach is the core of help2read’s work, it also has other projects to promote literacy, such as Reading Adventures, which run at local libraries.“We use puppet shows and other activities to spread the love for reading. We are also now undertaking a youth librarian training project together with Equal Education.”Such partnerships are an engine of growth, Andolfi says, emphasising that there is room for more, particularly with the education ministry. It has also recently expanded into Namibia, teaming up with the Michelle McLean Children Trust. Numbers are growinghelp2Read started as a pilot project in 2005 at Muizenberg Primary School, on the Cape Peninsula. It now works in about 90 schools in the Western Cape, with about 1 250 children. It also expanded into Gauteng in 2011, where it works in 15 schools and helps 250 pupils.“In the long run, our major goal is to be in rural areas, especially in Limpopo, Mpumalanga and Eastern Cape [where the need is greatest],” says Andolfi. “We must create skills in the areas where people live so that they can make a life there, and are not forced to migrate.”The mission, according to the group, is to “motivate the literate adult population in South Africa to pass on their skills to the next generation, helping children to become confident readers. The key to the future of help2read is the recruitment and development of volunteers from underprivileged communities”.Andolfi explains: “We try to train people to help themselves.” He points out that help2read is not a charity but is a developmental organisation. It’s the old story of teaching a person to fish rather than giving him a fish.Of course, the need is great. Volunteers and cash are constantly in demand. Corporates can help through donations, and individuals can also make donations – for just R100 a month, for example, you can sponsor a child to learn to read for a year. For R25 000, a company can sponsor an entire school.Donations and sponsorships are also used to get books. They come from publishing houses, which donate or give an NGO discount; through the US group Books for Africa; and from individuals.Books used in the programme are age-appropriate and in line with school requirements. Donated books that don’t fit this profile are sold back to the public. The cash raised through these book sales and other fundraising activities is poured right back into the literacy programme.The organisation is holding its annual fundraising dinner in Cape Town on 20 November.Description: Help2read works in schoolsMetatags: help2read, read, education, literacy, illiterate, volunteer, school, library, learner, book, MediaClub, Play Your Part, Brand South Africa, Brand SA, official siteGift that keeps on givingTeaching a child to read is a priceless gift. The world opens when you can read, and your prospects improve – a better job, a better life. The help2read organisation gives this gift to South African children.Lorraine KearneyLiteracy is key: if you can read, you can make something of yourself. “Literacy can break the cycle of poverty,” stresses Marco Andolfi, the business development manager of Cape Town-based non-profit Section 21 company help2read. The flipside is that if you cannot read, you are trapped – unemployed and unemployable, or stuck in a low-paid, unskilled job.With this in mind, help2read has designed a model that targets primary school children in under-resourced schools. “help2read is an organisation set up to promote child literacy across South Africa,” Andolfi explains. “We recruit and train local volunteers to help children in primary schools – mostly in grade three – to learn to read.”There are approximately five-million illiterate people in South Africa. And schools are not necessarily helping to lower these rates: according to the 2006 Pirls report, South African schoolchildren are three to five years behind their international counterparts. Pirls, the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study, is run by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement, an independent, international cooperative of national research institutions and governmental research agencies. First conducted in 2001, Pirls reports every five years on the reading achievement of fourth grade children worldwide.“The problem is that most South African children come from a culture of non-reading,” says Andolfi, “and this is added to poorly resourced schools.” There are no books at home; they don’t see or listen to their parents reading; they are not often, if ever, taken to a library; their schools frequently do not have libraries.How it workshelp2read places volunteers, each armed with a well-stocked book box, into participating schools. There are coordinator teachers at these schools who identify the pupils most in need. The volunteers then work one-on-one with these children, 30 minutes a week, for a year. In total, each volunteer spends two hours a week at their school. The long-term nature of the intervention helps to build strong relationships of trust between the child and the volunteer, as well as build the child’s self-confidence.“We have 686 volunteers working in our schools in Western Cape and Gauteng. It is unpaid work, and many of them are unemployed. It’s also a skills development project. We hold regular workshops for our volunteers, and they learn skills that will help them in finding work.”Some volunteers are employed and come in before work; others are retired people. Each volunteer is strictly vetted, with proper police clearances carried out, before they are trained. Only once this is done are they placed in schools. Of the volunteers, 52% are unemployed and live in disadvantaged areas. They often volunteer as a means of participating in meaningful activities that enhance their own skills and self-esteem. Women make up 93% of the volunteers.It seems to be working. “In 2011 we had assessments that found that after six months on our programme, learning improved by 14 months.” This brings the children up to speed.Although this school outreach is the core of help2read’s work, it also has other projects to promote literacy, such as Reading Adventures, which run at local libraries. “We use puppet shows and other activities to spread the love for reading. We are also now undertaking a youth librarian training project together with Equal Education.” Such partnerships are an engine of growth, Andolfi says, emphasising that there is room for more, particularly with the education ministry. It has also recently expanded into Namibia, teaming up with the Michelle McLean Children Trust.Numbers are growinghelp2Read started as a pilot project in 2005 at Muizenberg Primary School, on the Cape Peninsula. It now works in about 90 schools in the Western Cape, with about 1 250 children. It also expanded into Gauteng in 2011, where it works in 15 schools and helps 250 pupils. “In the long run, our major goal is to be in rural areas, especially in Limpopo, Mpumalanga and Eastern Cape [where the need is greatest],” says Andolfi. “We must create skills in the areas where people live so that they can make a life there, and are not forced to migrate.”The mission, according to the group, is to “motivate the literate adult population in South Africa to pass on their skills to the next generation, helping children to become confident readers. The key to the future of help2read is the recruitment and development of volunteers from underprivileged communities”.Andolfi explains: “We try to train people to help themselves.” He points out that help2read is not a charity but is a developmental organisation. It’s the old story of teaching a person to fish rather than giving him a fish.Of course, the need is great. Volunteers and cash are constantly in demand. Corporates can help through donations, and individuals can also make donations – for just R100 a month, for example, you can sponsor a child to learn to read for a year. For R25 000, a company can sponsor an entire school. Donations and sponsorships are also used to get books. They come from publishing houses, which donate or give an NGO discount; through the US group Books for Africa; and from individuals. Books used in the programme are age-appropriate and in line with school requirements. Donated books that don’t fit this profile are sold back to the public. The cash raised through these book sales and other fundraising activities is poured right back into the literacy programme.The organisation is holding its annual fundraising dinner in Cape Town on 20 November.Contact:Marco Andolfi, business development managerTel: +27 (0)21 685 8085Fax: +27 (0)86 511 2399last_img read more

SA launches second taxi assembly plant

first_img14 November 2012 Beijing Automobile Works SA, a joint venture involving China’s fourth-biggest vehicle manufacturer and South Africa’s Industrial Development Corporation, has opened a minibus taxi assembly factory east of Johannesburg in a R196-million investment that moves the country one step closer to full manufacture of taxis. “We see the assembly of taxis as a step towards full localisation and manufacture of taxis in South Africa,” Economic Development Minister Ebrahim Patel said at the launch of the first phase of the new factory in Springs. “It is envisaged that this project will not only supply the South African market, but also create export opportunities to the rest of Africa – a consumer base of one billion people on a continent registering some of the fastest growth rates in the global economy.”Localising the minibus manufacturing industry South Africa’s minibus taxi market is currently dominated by the Toyota Ses’fikile, which has been assembled locally since July, when Toyota launched a R70-million minibus taxi assembly line at its factory in Durban. According to Patel, these moves to localise the minibus manufacturing industry would see about two-thirds, or nearly 16 000, of the local demand for 23 000 new minibus taxis a year being assembled in South Africa. “While there are about 200 000 taxis on the road in South Africa, it is estimated that there are a further 100 000 in the rest of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), with an annual demand of about 12 000 taxis, or about 50% of the annual demand in South Africa,” he added. Beijing Automobile Works (BAW), a subsidiary of Chinese state-owned Beijing Automotive Industry Holding Company‚ China’s fourth-biggest vehicle manufacturer‚ is a 51% shareholder in BAW South Africa, with the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) holding 24.5% of shares and the balance belonging to China Africa Motors. BAW South Africa chief executive James Chung said the project was one of the first significant investments by a Chinese vehicle manufacturer in South Africa’s automotive industry. The Springs factory will assemble the new 16-seater minibus taxis designed and developed under the international BAW brand. Chung said the vehicles would include a free two-year, 200 000-kilometre service plan to ensure that they were both affordable and safe. The factory, with an annual capacity of 9 600 vehicles, will produce taxis on a semi knocked-down (SKD) basis over the next three years before progressing to completely knocked-down (CKD) manufacturing at greater capacity levels.Bus, truck and minibus programme IDC chief executive Geoffrey Qhena said the joint venture fell under the Department of Trade and Industry’s local bus, truck and minibus programme, and would provide many benefits to South Africa, including increased localization of the automotive industry and export opportunities. Qhena added that the investment underlined the growing cooperation between the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) grouping of countries. Minister Patel said the Springs plant would create 470 jobs in its first phase, and more over the next few years as the company increased its level of localisation. “This investment supports the New Growth Path goals of increased industrialisation and shifting South Africa away from reliance on imports of manufactured goods,” Patel said. He added that the skills development component of the project would include extensive training of employees by BAW over the first two years, as well as employees receiving training at BAW’s plants in Beijing. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Anti-animal agriculture concerns raised in push to make animal abuse a felony

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Joel PenhorwoodA new bill — the PACT Act — has been introduced in Congress that looks to make animal abuse a felony — a more serious punishment than the current state-by-state laws. Livestock farmers in general continue to be at the forefront of animal welfare, but this latest federal legislation is drawing some questions. The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) is pushing for the measure.Hannah Thompson-Weeman, vice president of communications for the non-profit Animal Agriculture Alliance, said the PACT Act seems to have animal agriculture as a target.“You might think what’s wrong with that, we’re all opposed to animal cruelty and that’s absolutely true,” she said. “All of us in animal agriculture take animal welfare very seriously and want to see animals treated well and raised ethically, but we have some concerns with what HSUS would consider cruel, because they are very opposed to the existence of animal agriculture, certainly to large-scale modern practices, so we have some concerns with what this might shape into.”PACT stands for Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture and the act looks to prosecute for abuse involving crushing, burning, drowning, suffocating, and impaling animals and sexually exploiting them.Thompson-Weeman said the open-ended buzz words bring up concerns.“One of the words mentioned is burning. So is dehorning going to be considered cruelty and a federal felony under this proposed legislation? There is also the word suffocation used. Well sometimes CO2 euthanasia is used in the poultry and pork industries. Could that be considered suffocation and now become a felony under this proposed legislation? There are certainly some words that we find potentially alarming,” she said.The question has also been raised about the Act’s duplicity with each state already having their own animal-abuse laws on the books. The Animal Agriculture Alliance has a breakdown of state-by-state laws at this link.Exceptions are built into the proposed legislation for veterinarians and hunting, but notably not for agriculture or animal research — something that differs from much of current state legislation.“A lot of those state legislations do consider animal agriculture to be an exemption, because again there are things that might happen to an animal when we’re raising them for food that wouldn’t be done to a pet. For example, we don’t slaughter dogs and cats for food here in the United States. There are things that would be considered cruel if we were doing them for no reason, but because we’re doing them in the pursuit of raising animals for food in a healthy, sustainable way, they are obviously not considered cruel. Again, there is a lot of debate among activist groups about what they would consider cruel and from their perspective, raising animals for food is inherently cruel,” Thompson-Weeman said.HSUS is known to back such efforts with an anti-animal agriculture agenda. The PACT Act, introduced by congressmen Ted Deutch and Vern Buchanan, a Democrat and Republican from Florida, has also been endorsed by the National Sheriffs Association and the Fraternal Order of Police.Thompson-Weeman said this serves as a unique opportunity for farmers to share with consumers how livestock are cared for.“It is very important to be proactive in these conversations. If we can go to someone before they’ve heard something when we’re not reacting to an issue, it’s much more effective. So certainly now is a great time opportunity to do outreach in your community,” she said. “We have a lot of new legislators that have been elected in last fall’s election, so if you are engaged in lobbying or even if you just want to have a relationship with an elected official, this is an excellent time to reach out and build those relationships. Because when they see these bills come across their desk or they get asked to sponsor things, if they know they have a farmer they can call and get the real deal, that can really help us influence what goes on.”last_img read more

20 days agoMan Utd boss Solskjaer forced to delete Twitter account

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd boss Solskjaer forced to delete Twitter accountby Paul Vegas20 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has deleted his Twitter account.Solskjaer has left Twitter after being targeted by vicious trolls in the aftermath of Thursday’s dire goalless draw at AZ Alkmaar.According to reports the abuse forced the Norwegian, who used to manager Molde in his native Norway, to close his account, @olegs26_ole.Although it was not verified with a tick it had had a total of 124,000 followers, including a number of players including club captain Ashley Young.The biog read: “Dad of 3 fantastic kids, married to a wonderful wife and Manager of Molde FK, ex footballer.” This was accompanied by an image of him with Ryan Giggs. last_img read more

Oklahoma WR Randomly Trolls Texas, Tweets “Horns Down” Logo

first_imgUpside down Texas logo.TwitterOklahoma freshman-to-be Dede Westbrook hasn’t even played a snap for the Sooners yet, but he’s already talking a bit of trash to the team’s biggest rival. Westbrook, a four-star wide receiver who will begin his freshman year in 2015, decided to randomly tweeted a “horns down” logo Thursday night. It’s a strong move out the gate. #Sooners pic.twitter.com/y4vkHztQy5— Dede Westbrook (@DedeTHEGreat11) March 6, 2015The Texas vs. Oklahoma rivalry took a back seat in 2014, as TCU and Baylor reigned supreme in the Big 12. Perhaps Westbrook will help bring it back to the forefront.last_img

Oregon Media Relations Staffer Fires Back At Steve Sarkisian After USC Coach Takes Shot At The Ducks

first_imgSteve Sarkisian USC vs. Oregon tweets.Steve Sarkisian USC OregonThe two most successful program in the Pac-12 over the last decade or so have been Oregon and USC. So, it’s only natural for there to be a little bit of a rivalry between the two programs. And there is one, whether or not the players and coaches will actually admit it. The rivalry’s hotness level rose a bit this afternoon, when Trojans’ coach Steve Sarkisian took a low-key shot at the Ducks when discussing USC’s uniform plans. “We’re not going to take the field this year in 13 different uniforms in 13 games this year.” – Sark, taking a low-key shot at Oregon.— Chantel Jennings (@ChantelJennings) July 31, 2015Oregon media relations staffer Joe Waltasti fired back at the USC coach in awesome fashion. Sark 0-5 vs. Oregon as a head coach… https://t.co/WKSvSwdk6K— Joe Waltasti (@GoDucksJoe) July 31, 2015Oregon has outscored Sark coached teams 227-97. #tradition https://t.co/dIEbwrVhvj— Joe Waltasti (@GoDucksJoe) July 31, 2015Oregon and USC are set to meet Nov. 21. in Eugene. We can’t wait for that one.last_img read more

Video: Draymond Green Says If He Could Hit Someone With A Snowball, It’d Be A Michigan Fan

first_imgDraymond Green being interviewed.draymond green snowball michigan fanThursday, Nike released a new two-minute commercial dedicated to “Snow Days” which features over a dozen of the brand’s professional athletes lining up against each other on the football field. One of those athletes is former Michigan State star Draymond Green, who now plays for the Golden State Warriors.Nike also released a “Behind The Scenes” look at the commercial, and asked a few of the athletes who they’d hit with a snowball, given the chance. Green’s answer? A University of Michigan fan. Check it out:This isn’t the first time Green has expressed his dislike for the Wolverines. If you’re interested, here’s the actual commercial – it’s actually very cool.last_img