Rugby Book Review – For the Glory

first_imgBUY IT AT:  amazon.co.uk RRP:  £16.99  PUBLISHED BY:  JR BooksGot a rugby book or DVD you’d like us to review in the Armchair Zone? Email [email protected] article appeared in the November 2009 issue of Rugby World Magazine Rudy Scholz closes down France’s Henri Galau during the infamous 1924 final TWO YEARS ago we reported on the interwar USA rugby team, which won back-to-back Olympic gold medals despite the fact many of the team were strangers to the game, writes Rugby World deputy editor Alan Pearey. Now Mark Ryan has delved deeper to add flesh to this extraordinary story (albeit that they had only France to beat in 1920, and only France and Romania as opponents four years later).Ryan’s tale revolves around shy farmer Babe Slater and brash lawyer Rudy Scholz, who emerged as key figures in the American side that felled France 17-3 in the 1924 final in Paris. It was probably the dirtiest rugby match ever played, skipper Slater repeatedly pleading with the Welsh referee to NOT send off a succession of Frenchmen for dastardly deeds. Slater reasoned that his team’s very lives would be endangered by any dismissals, such was the fury of a crowd that, already anti-American in sentiment because of political tensions between the two nations, had been angered by the visitors’ complaints about poor treatment in preceding weeks – the USA team had even formed a scrum to take on French immigration officials! When the Americans then shocked the French in the Olympic final, the anger in the stands spilled over, a number of American spectators being attacked and hospitalized.Pierre de Coubertin, the IOC president, was in the crowd that shameful day and rugby was thrown out of the Olympic movement. On 9 October 2009, the IOC officially voted to admit rugby (sevens) back into the Games – and this time the French better keep their cool. Still, it might have been worse: one event considered for the 1920 Games in Antwerp was… grenade-throwing.Check out the recovered video of the 1924 final…RW RATING 4/5 TAGS: Book Review Do you want to buy the issue of Rugby World in which this article appeared? Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipcOr perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

30 Minutes with… Matt Evans

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS High jinks: Matt Evans challenges Ireland’s Luke Fitzgerald for a high ball. Photo: Getty Images I’d be Jeff Hassler because he trains the least and gets strong hair points.What’s your most embarrassing moment?I was chasing back for Cornish Pirates against Moseley and went head-first through some solid boards. The ref put his head over to see if I was alright, but no one helped me!How was the World Cup, off the field? We got treated like royalty and that was new to a lot of us. The fans were great. Not many of us are household names but there was a buzz. I was lucky enough to play in NZ in 2011 and this was even better.Who impressed you for Canada?Head and shoulders above was DTH van der Merwe. Jamie Cudmore and him are our marquee guys. When you have these guys you expect them to step up every time and they did that.Winging in: DTH Van Der Merwe scores against Romania at RWC 2015. Photo: Getty ImagesHow did you rate the performance of lower-tier teams? The Japan defeat of South Africa shone out but performances from Georgia were great too. It was just the way Tier Two teams pulled out good performances. No team coasted to the quarters and maybe with four more years of development it will be even closer.So you’d like more meaningful Tests for Canada?Absolutely. It would do us no end of good. It’s difficult just turning up every four years for World Cups. You need to get the fundamentals right. It can be difficult to put pressure on big teams and do Tier Two proud if you don’t play as much.What would you like to achieve away from rugby? What are your bugbears?I hate it when people don’t help with carrying team kit and walk right past it. Gordon McRorie is bad for that.What is your guilty pleasure?I’m a big dessert man. I’m the first up for seconds and I’m always on hand if a team-mate doesn’t fancy theirs.Who is your funniest Canada team-mate?Jebb Sinclair probably thinks he’s the funniest. I would say our prop Doug Wooldridge is a funny guy though. It’s all about understanding his take on the world. It’s not that realistic, I’d say.Any practical jokes you can share with us?The front-row guys like to do one where they fill a bin full of water and lean it against a door…Who would you like to be stuck in a lift with?Jessica Ennis. Because of her gold medals – that’s a real area of interest. Definitely not for any other reason!Gold standard: Jessica Ennis-Hill is someone Evans would like to meet. Photo: Getty ImagesWhat’s been your funniest on-pitch moment?Two streakers broke onto the pitch on the night we played against France! Well, they weren’t wearing bottoms, but they did have on Canada tops.If you could have any superpower, what would it be and why?Teleportation, because it would be good to get back to Canada regularly. But also if you’re ever in trouble – ZAP! I’d go back to Vancouver Island, where my family come from.If you could be any team-mate, who would you be and why?center_img I’d love to own my own coffee shop in Canada. My missus has one in Penzance called The Front Room. I wouldn’t be working hard in mine, though. I fancy myself as a bit of a schmoozer!This article appeared in the December 2015 edition of Rugby World. For the latest subscription offers click here, or find out how to download the digital edition here. Canada full-back Matt Evans talks pranks, streakers and Hassler’s hairlast_img read more

Saints and sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgCanada conquerors: England after winning the Vancouver Sevens, their second title of the series (Getty) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Lung-burster: Freddie Burns just evades Nathan Earle to score Tigers’ fourth try at Saracens (Getty)Tigers, who have won the Anglo-Welsh Cup in its various guises seven times, now prepare for a Twickenham Stoop final this Sunday against Exeter.The Chiefs, who are in their third successive final, beat Harlequins 24-7 in the other semi-final.Exeter’s youngsters impressed greatly but the highlight has to be the moment when referee Dan Jones inadvertently jabbed Adam Jones in the face when he raised his arm unaware of the Welsh prop’s presence behind him!THE SINNERSConcussion countThe stat of the weekend was provided by Scotland coach Vern Cotter – eight concussions suffered in two away games.After the heavy toll in Paris, Stuart Hogg, Ryan Wilson and Tommy Seymour all left the Twickenham pitch permanently because of head knocks.England were always favourites to win but that disruption had a huge impact on the game, with two half-backs, Ali Price and Duncan Weir, deployed at wing and full-back respectively.High toll: Fortunately Ryan Wilson walked off himself after colliding with Jamie George (Getty)Are concussions creeping up, instead of down, as a result of players trying to tackle lower? I’m sure that, in time, a research study will tell us but for now it appears to be sheer wretched luck that’s afflicting the Scots.I switched over to the Vancouver Sevens at one point at the weekend and within moments was seeing a Scotland Sevens player take a bang to the face.You’re due some good fortune, Scotland.Horror showThis blog will be keeping tabs on New Zealand’s Super Rugby franchises, and until the weekend had seen plenty to cause the British & Irish Lions concern ahead of their summer tour.The Blues v Highlanders match, however, should have made the Lions feel better. For two Kiwi teams, the skills execution was shocking, with up-and-unders being spilled, passes being fumbled and kicks going astray – one punt by Aaron Smith went through the posts!“This is bordering on horrible,” said commentator Tony Johnson during a particularly scruffy period. For the record, Highlanders won 16-12 but both teams will expect to improve hugely in their next outing.Scrappy: Highlanders’ Malakai Fekitoa (kneeling) got the only try in the error-ridden win over BluesThe pitch is for playersHow intrusive should TV companies be to bring us ‘closer to the action’? Pre-match ‘pitch walks’ are harmless, even if the players interviewed rarely say anything of interest.Flash interviews at half-time can make you a feel a little uneasy, because the player clearly wants to get into the changing room for the coach’s briefing.But in-match interviews? A definite no-no! Brumbies wing Henry Speight had the misfortune to have a mic stuck under his nose as he walked back to his half after scoring against Western Force.He was still catching his breath and we didn’t understand a word of his reply, but what on earth do TV executives think we’ll learn from this situation in any case?Give the players some space! This tweet by Newcastle’s media manager Mark Smith sums it up nicely. THE SAINTSVroom vroom in VancouverSouth Africa’s march to the HSBC World Rugby Sevens Series title looks unstoppable, but they encountered a hiccup in Vancouver.Two, in fact, because they were held to a draw by England Sevens in the pool stage after Dan Norton’s double and then succumbed 19-7 to Simon Amor’s team in the final.England (103) have now leapfrogged Fiji (100) to go second in the points table, with the Blitzboks (126) still well clear with four rounds remaining.Continuity of selection is working a treat for England, whose 40-7 semi-final defeat of Fiji was one of the great sevens performances. Fiji barely touched the ball as England racked up six tries against the reigning series and Olympic champions.Dangerous Dan: Dan Norton scores England’s third try of the Vancouver Sevens Cup final (Getty)Norton is joint first with Collins Injera in the all-time try list with 244 and he topped the Vancouver Performance Tracker table, with Dan Bibby third, but this is a team of equals. They remain the only side to have beaten South Africa (three times) in this series.And there’s room for improvement because too many of England’s passes checked the receiver, costing those fractions of seconds that can make the difference. They lack South Africa’s speed onto the ball, and sometimes align deeper than necessary, but hey, they’re the second best sevens team on the planet.Georgia on the agendaA crowd of 55,000 saw Georgia beat Russia 28-14 in Tbilisi, keeping them on course for a seventh successive Six Nations B title.The Lelos are now up to 12th in the world rankings – two places above Italy – and last week saw promotion to the Six Nations discussed at a Rugby Europe board meeting.The 17-strong board, representing the 48 unions affiliated to the European governing body, voted unanimously to open dialogue about a “closer integration of competitions” and particularly access to the Six Nations.Big noise: Georgia, here at RWC 2015, continue to press their Six Nations case (Barcroft Media/Getty)Octavian Morariu, president of Rugby Europe, said: “We are open to consider all alternatives, either a direct relegation, the insertion of an annual or biennial play-off system; the integration of one or two teams or the set-up of a real European competition, etc…“We are aware this process will require time to build a common project and achieve it. But we need to start a real collaboration in the interests of European rugby growth.”As Georgia head to Bucharest for Sunday’s Rugby Europe Championship decider, this issue, quite properly, is not going away.Special KayKay Wilson was a non-playing reserve for Team GB at the Olympics, where the team just missed out on a medal, but life has been sweet ever since.In September she was awarded a full-time professional RFU contract and at the weekend the Richmond winger scored an astonishing seven tries against Scotland as England’s women stayed on track for an expected Grand Slam.In truth, Wilson, 25, didn’t have to do much for any of them – just run straight towards the try-line! – but her searing pace is obvious.The 3G pitch at Donnybrook for the title decider against Ireland should be to her liking.Magnificent seven: Kay Wilson scores against Scotland, part of a record individual haul (Getty)Freddie at the readyFreddie Burns, the Leicester and England fly-half, was right to feel put out by the way his transfer to Bath was handled.But true to his character, he has rolled his sleeves up and is doing his utmost to help the Tigers put their winter horrors behind them by winning silverware.Burns, whose dad Jerry recently became the oldest player to appear for Combe Down’s 1st XV, at 58, had a super game as Leicester knocked out the Anglo-Welsh Cup holders Saracens, 32-10.His game-clinching interception try necessitated am 80-metre sprint and secured Leicester’s first win at Allianz Park at the seventh attempt. Their last away win against Sarries had been at Vicarage Road.center_img TAGS: Georgia For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.Leave me alone! Henry Speight was interviewed on the pitch after scoring for the Brumbies (Getty)last_img read more

What’s inside Rugby World’s European special?

first_img Rugby World celebrates the return of the European Champions and Challenge Cups in the new issue, with predictions for all of the pools, an in-depth feature on Saracens, exclusive interviews with Ospreys half-backs Dan Biggar and Rhys Webb, and much more. Find out how to download the digital edition here and these are ten reasons to buy the November 2017 edition of the magazine…1. Stephen JonesOur regular columnist makes his predictions for all ten pools in the Champions and Challenge Cups, as well as looking at the European competition structure as a whole and giving his verdict on what needs to change.2. Inside SaracensRugby World goes behind the scenes at Saracens to find out what makes the back-to-back European champions tick. As well as speaking to director of rugby Mark McCall, we find out more about their culture from the players and meet some of the club’s unsung heroes.3. My life in pictures… Conrad SmithAll Black great Conrad Smith, who is preparing for a Challenge Cup campaign with Pau, talks through a selection of photographs that represent key moments in his career. Get bonus content from Smith here.Safe hands: Scott Fardy in action for his new team Leinster in the Guinness Pro14. Photo: Getty Images4. Scott FardyLeinster’s Wallaby recruit talks about settling in Ireland and reflects on the failings of SANZAAR following the axing of Western Force from Super Rugby.5. Women’s focusNew Zealand’s Sarah Goss reveals what it’s like to win a World Cup in both sevens and XVs, England captain and No 8 Sarah Hunter gives her top tips on controlling the ball at the back of the scrum while Women’s World Cup final referee Joy Neville talks about swapping playing for officiating. Ten reasons to buy the November 2017 edition of Rugby World magazine TAGS: HighlightSaracens 6. Scarlets analysisRugby World’s new resident analyst Sean Holley explains why Scarlets’ attack is so effective and how it could thrive in Europe.7. Welcome to my club…In the second of our new series, RW’s Alan Dymock heads to Richmond Athletic Ground for a Greene King IPA Championship double header and finds out how London Scottish and Richmond cohabit.Double act: Ospreys and Wales half-backs Rhys Webb and Dan Biggar. Photo: Huw Evans Agency8. Dan Biggar & Rhys WebbWith Dan Biggar announcing that he will join Northampton next year, this is the final season that the fly-half will be lining up together with Rhys Webb at the Ospreys. Rugby World editor Owain Jones speaks to the pair about what it’s like to play alongside each other and Biggar’s decision to leave Wales.9. Ben Ryan on talent IDThe man who guided Fiji to Olympic gold shares his thoughts on England Sevens’ selection process and explains why “football puts rugby to shame in terms of talent identification”.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HERE10. Grass-roots clubs sectionOur grass-roots club section returns with clubs editor Michael Austin rounding up all the news from around the country. If you have any stories to share, please email him on [email protected]center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Plus, all this…Ryan Wilson on being appointed Glasgow captain.Johnny McNicholl talks Scarlets, babies and travelling.The lowdown on Connacht hooker Tom McCartney.An exclusive Q&A with Sale’s new boy James O’Connor.Dwayne Peel explains why he joined Ulster and his transition from player to coach.The Secret Player gives his verdict on referees.Inside the mind of Worcester skipper Donncha O’Callaghan.last_img read more

Fear Factor: the role of anxiety and fear in rugby

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Fear is a significant presence when you’re scaling Everest. But is it the same on a rugby pitch? This feature first appeared in the August 2018 issue of Rugby World. Fear Factor: the role of anxiety and fear in rugbyHAVE YOU ever heard of alexithymia? Tim Woodman, a psychotherapist and sports psychology professor at Bangor University, has you covered. “It’s from the Greek – lex- is ‘words’, and –thymia is ‘feelings’. A- means a lack of. So it’s a lack of words for feelings. It’s a difficulty identifying and expressing emotions.”Woodman had always wondered what drove mountaineers to take on long, arduous and ultimately dangerous expeditions like tackling Everest. He concluded that it wasn’t thrill-seeking, despite what some thought. What was it?“I got to reading the biography of these people,” he explains. “The more I looked into it, the more I realised those who take part in expeditions tend to find the stress of a climb – potentially being caught in an avalanche, in a remote area, with a risk of death – somewhat less stressful than a traditional married relationship.“That got me thinking that there must be an emotional component to that. The emotions that they feel in the mountains are clear, whereas the emotions they feel in a relationship for example are less clear. Or nebulous, vague or obtuse.“They can identify what emotion they feel at the time they are on the mountain, which is fear. ‘Okay, I understand that feeling, there’s a reason to be fearful.’ In a traditional human relationship we are fearful without understanding why. Why am I scared of this person’s emotion? But they wouldn’t use the word fear in that context because it doesn’t fit the bill when you compare it to the mountain.“It’s more an underpinning anxiety which is difficult to get a hold of. It is an underlying unease.”Woodman settled on a model of alexithymic traits he felt he could hang his hat on: firstly, that such individuals struggle to regulate their emotions and actually head towards situations most people shy away from – extremes of anxiety and fear. Secondly, they struggle with a sense of agency: they feel like a pawn in life’s great game of chess.Related: Rugby World’s investigationsBeing based in Wales, Woodman has inevitably been confronted with the question of what this means in the context of rugby. “Potentially rugby rewards someone who is alexithymic in that to not feel too much fear is a benefit,” he says. “Going in for a hard tackle, if you worry about getting your head knocked off that’s probably not a good thing. It’s best to go in hard and low, but if you hold back you’re more likely to get hurt, so I can see a benefit to that.“With the social domain, it can also limit interactions between team-mates, especially if you’re out with injury or talking about what kind of play you like. Exchanging conversation on that sort of level is essential for effective teamwork. It’s potentially a double-edged sword.”Extreme athlete: Welshman Richard Parks when he played for Leeds TykesOne man who can address the crossovers between rugby and extreme sports is Richard Parks. From December 2010, the former Wales flanker spent just over six months scaling the highest mountains on all seven continents and completing the Three Poles Challenge (reaching the North and South Poles and climbing to the summit of Everest).In 2014 he completed a solo expedition to the South Pole. Parks has also spoken publicly of the “dark hole” he fell into when injury destroyed his rugby career.He offers his view. “I guess in both of my careers – I say both because I feel like I’ve had two different lives – I can certainly think of people who had similar characteristics to (alexithymia). I don’t think that’s necessarily been my situation.”Parks could express his emotions well. But he chose to keep them to himself at first.“My experiences have changed my perspective on our emotional make-up. As a player I had always seen fear as a really negative thing and I’d always seen my insecurities and sporadic battle with anxiety – nothing clinical but the general anxiety about mistakes, dropping a ball, getting dropped – as a negative. In hindsight I had always lived as a bit of a roller-coaster of emotions, sometimes being aware of it, sometimes not having any management strategies, and most definitely not being able to talk about it.“What I found in this chapter of my life, and it’s a product of the dark place I went to as I transitioned out of rugby through injury, is that my experiences in extreme environments, life and death situations, have actually challenged me to look at these characteristics as enablers; they are positive parts of my make-up.”Parks talks eloquently about how thoughts of never returning home have powered him. Stepping over bodies and feeling the genuine chill of environments that can kill you has forced him to use his fear as a motivator. Suddenly, obsessing over ‘what-ifs’ means he is planning better; he is training ferociously. By Parks’s reckoning, despite how seriously he took his rugby, he is able to get 40-50% more out of his body now. As Parks concludes: “Our relationship with fear has the power to define us.”This feature first appeared in the August 2018 issue of Rugby World. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Woodman recently helped stage a study of a group of ‘super-elite’ athletes; serial gold medal winners, the best of the best. He suggests they share a near-psychotic drive to win at all costs – something he believes is an alexithymic trait. Parks contests any necessity to treat support networks as disposable in order to achieve lofty goals. He loves and needs to be part of a team.The Welshman is also driven by literal concerns over life and death. He asks aloud if the Martin Johnsons and Brian O’Driscolls of this world make rugby feel like life and death in their heads, pushing them to greatness.Fear as fuel: Jeremy Snape speaks at the World Rugby Conference and ExhibitionEx-England cricketer Jeremy Snape runs Sporting Edge, a high-performance consultancy business. He also served as England’s psychologist for 18 months of Eddie Jones’s tenure. He says: “Fear is a natural preparation response to a ‘threat’. It happens in the gap between stimulus and response. Our brains were built 50,000 years ago and haven’t had an upgrade since, so we still get the same physiological response that cavemen had in fearing a sabre-toothed tiger.“The modern threat is different. It’s to our self-esteem, pride or professional reputation, but the truth is our brain prefers safety and habit. So whenever we get something which we interpret as a threat, fear’s aim is to keep us safe. The difference for top performers in elite sport, the performing arts or military is that they feel the fear and move forward, not back.“As an England cricketer I remember times my confidence was low and I was playing against some of the world’s best. Arms felt heavy, my mind was clouded and contaminated by what might happen if I fail. This is the problem: our mind races forward to consequences of failure. That affects our mind and body in the moment so it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.“The problem with fear is that because we have such vivid imaginations, we can catastrophise the failures to be so out of proportion that the fear is worse than the actual failure itself! It can be debilitating, mentally and physically. Mentally tough people have the ability to switch their inner critic into something which fuels performance rather than prevents it.”Related: Our investigation into alcohol issues in rugbyThere is one man who feels blessed he never had fear of confrontation. Former Namibia and Saracens enforcer Jacques Burger never hid from an on-field wreck.“I was blessed,” Burger tells Rugby World. “I never had fear of contact or of getting injured. I loved getting stuck in. It was more mental than physical.”Like Parks, Burger’s fear was of failure. He relished the battle, and played in a wild style that meant he was everywhere at all times. Then fear “would raise its ugly head” as he worried about letting mates down, not doing enough. There’s more.“At a young age I struggled with depression; I struggled with fear and anxiety,” Burger explains. “I’ve had my fair share of personal battles but had to take on depression after going through that when I was younger. But rugby was how I expressed myself. Rugby helped.”Total commitment: Jacques Burger in action during his time with SaracensAt Saracens, Burger was unburdened. Allowed to stop overthinking things and just play his way – “If you’re going to miss, miss big” – he thrived. He could talk about his issues too, and when he had potentially career-threatening injuries he realised his body could come through things. In an extreme example, he says that junkies show what a human body can go through and still cling on.So he faced his fears and never stopped throwing himself at his on-field problems.There were still nerves, obviously. Snape says that most champions he knows feel nerves are vital. The ideal mindset is one that recognises the importance of the game and sees the dangers of being hurt but is so dedicated to the next play that the athlete jumps in selflessly, he says.Woodman sees the short-term benefits of alexithymia in rugby but wonders if, in the long term, injuries may pile up for alexithymic competitors. Snape merely notes that the focus of the ideal mindset makes it much more likely that a player will get their technique spot-on.Who knows if things could have been different for Parks? He had an unhealthy relationship with fear and anxiety when he was younger, he repeats. He ran from it. Now he embraces it. We should all be more willing to address our fears and discuss them, he insists, regardless of whether we’re elite rugby players or not.last_img read more

Who has the most beautiful kick in world rugby?

first_imgWe asked elite kicking coaches how valuable it really is to have an attractive kick Smooth: A side-on view of Pumas star Nicolas Sanchez kicking (Getty Images) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Unique stance: Rob Cook during his time at Gloucester (Getty Images)“If you look at my stance, the bit before I actually stand up and kick, it’s irrelevant really,” explains ex-pro Rob Cook, when asked if his split-leg, forward-leaning pose before attacking a kick got too much attention. “That just happened. When I was at uni and I was kicking, I had a stance like Jonny Wilkinson, or at least I had my hands like Jonny. I don’t know what happened, but then I just got a little bit wider. I think it was more mental than anything with me. It was working so why change it?“Everyone’s different, you know. Your body’s built in a different way. Owen Farrell is what, 6ft 2in? He’s a certain weight, he carries his body differently to everyone else. So you’ve got to find what works for you. When I’m coaching, you can give players the basics, but it’s about finding what works for them. It might not look right but if it’s going over nine times out of ten what’s the point of changing it?”“It might not look right but if it’s going over nine times out of ten what’s the point of changing it?”Cook fell into the job of kicking at Cornish Pirates, explaining that he was around sixth on a list of potential marksmen until five injuries hit the squad at once. He laughs that there was a rule in place that if he ever missed three in a row he would relinquish the job, but that a sitter in front of the posts would always present itself.He agrees that timing is still the key factor, regardless whether the kick is an absolute pig or a stunner. He explains that although he could be wayward, Billy Twelvetrees was capable of sending the ball blurring into the great beyond when his timing was right. He has also witnessed James Hook land long-rangers, despite rarely practising from far away.And with this talk of timing, any comparison with golf is not as silly as some may think, according to Cilliers.Putting in the hours: France’s fly-half Romain Ntamack (Getty Images)“There are actually lot of similarities,” the South African says. “For example, the head must be as still as possible – keep your eyes on the ball. You should have no quick hip rotation. You can’t swing if your hips are in front of your hitting of the ball. You can’t kick if your hips are open too much before you complete your swing.“And there must be rhythm. There must be timing on the ball. But also keep your head down as long as possible – only lift your head after you complete your follow-through. Your shoulders must be square to the ball, like golf too.”Okay, but as a kicking coach, would he rather work with someone who is wayward but silky looking, or someone who gets the job done but it ain’t too pretty? Going back to golf, for example, Hodgson holds up Jim Furyk’s loopy swing as a example of getting the job done regardless of how aesthetically pleasing the swing is. In response, Cilliers considers the value of control.Related: Warren Gatland voted greatest ever coachThe coach begins: “I would prefer to work with a guy who’s not accurate, who might have a good technique. Because I can work on accuracy, I can improve their accuracy and I know what to fix to get them there. Then your timing and your technique can improve.“Say you take a Dustin Johnson or a Rory McIlroy. These guys have a beautiful swing but also use a lot of power. It’s about being able to control the power so that the ball can go in the direction they want it to go. You can’t use too much power because there’s a lot of stuff that can go wrong. You actually get more with timing, you get more with rhythm and then comes more distance and accuracy. So a guy like a Justin Thomas, an old guy like Ernie Els or even Justin Rose – they have a beautiful golf swing, beautiful control and there’s only one movement from them as well.Smooth swing: Rory McIlroy tees off in Florida (Getty Images)“If you see a guy with a lot of power and his technique is not too bad then you are just going to make small adjustments to his technique. It’s about minimising the mistakes.”Of course, if the ball is going between the poles, there is less pressure to beautify the technique. Nevertheless, there is one aspect that may still need to be considered, despite how successful a kicker is today. You need to think about the years ahead.“I never really got coached down at Pirates because they were going over, so they didn’t do anything with me,” Cook says. “But it was hurting my back a little bit, so I had to get that balance right.“I agree that there’s definitely an efficient way to kick. And if it’s causing you problems and injuries, it’s not working really, is it? Then obviously over time, that’s when you’re going to struggle. That’s probably why kickers go through bad patches.”Cilliers says he is a firm believer in working with medics and conditioners to prepare players for the repetition of kicks. True, he also believes in amassing lots of reps in training to nail down the technique. However, it is a good approach generally to be supple and have a strong core, he adds. We getting closer to get back to normal again, getting out there and start to put in the hard work, #hardworkpaysoff,#LockdownSA,#BelieveInYourself,#keepmoving,@FranceRugby,@SchoolofKicking,@SARugbymag,@AllistairMcCaw pic.twitter.com/zlS6kPbzB3— Vlok Cilliers (@Vlokskop10) June 7, 2020The France assistant has also seen players with the yips, much like a golfer. It especially affects those kicking from areas of the field that some would see as a gimme, he says. He believes in building confidence through repetition of those kicks, then working on mental techniques – sometimes using a mantra of sorts – to take them back to that space in their mind so it feels like just another rep.Cook, 35, never really got the yips. He rarely kicks now anyway, with the Malvern player-coach happier to let younger players hone their craft. But when he did, he preferred to zone out, maybe even have a song in his head, than obsess over each aspect of his technique. Focus on one aspect and another could slide, he reckons.It takes all sorts to land a nudge. As Grayson says, some are just prettier than others. Anyway, you don’t want to focus too much on that art to the detriment of anything else. As Cook concludes: “Let’s not forget, you’ve still gotta play rugby as well. Probably some of the best kickers aren’t very good rugby players!”Undoubtedly it’s better to strive for the total package than simply yearn to have a stunner of a nudge. Who has the most beautiful kick in world rugby?It could be the graceful classic from Rory McIlroy or the athletic twist from Adam Scott. It might be another stick slinger who makes you swoon. Either way, in golf you could while away hours talking about who has the prettiest swing on tour.Out there, people want to know who has the best. Which got us wondering: Is there much debate about who has the most beautiful kick in rugby? Maybe it matters, maybe it doesn’t. It’s worth asking those who make it their business to watch kick after kick after kick…“What a question – it has sparked a lot of debate amongst the back-room staff and some of the players,” Leinster kicking coach and chief analyst Emmet Farrell replies, when asked. For him it comes down to a few select names.“As you can imagine, a lot of names have been thrown around. Nicolás Sánchez, Juan Martín Hernández and Federico Todeschini from Argentina. There’s Morgan Parra and Lionel Beauxis. All use minimal effort, are very relaxed and rely on outstanding timing.“For me, outside of Leinster’s kickers of course, it has to come down to two players I’ve witnessed up close and in person: Ruan Pienaar and Frans Steyn.Huge power: Springbok Frans Steyn (Getty Images)“Steyn’s style is no fuss and raw power. I’ve never seen anybody who can generate the power Steyn can – it’s simply phenomenal. I remember he kicked a penalty at the RDS for Racing, from directly under the coaches’ box, that still hasn’t landed! Watching him in a pre-match warm up for Montpellier was amazing.“Piennar is the opposite. A very tall, elegant player. Again there’s no fuss but he has great balance and gets every inch out of those long levers. He never looks under pressure and doesn’t change his routine whatever the situation.”Related: Leigh Halfpenny on how to kick for goalOf course if you were to plump for a name, personal style preference would have to be a factor. There is a galaxy out there of kickers with their own unique tics, their foibles, their own mental cues that let them know these are the perfect conditions to swing your leg at the ball. There could be those with varying degrees of smoothness. Some might lean back more. There might be kickers with more of a snap to their follow-through. However, some individuals do get mentioned over and again.Former England and Saints fly-half Paul Grayson touches on a reason for some getting the attention. “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it depends what you’re like,” he says, “but instinctively you’re drawn to footballing skills.At his languid best: Diego Dominguez for Italy, 1999 (Getty Images)“Argentina produces languid, easy, football-style, laid-back, no fuss, smooth-as-silk kickers – though not necessarily the best results all the time. It goes all the way back from Hugo Porta to (Diego) Dominguez and then Nicolás Sánchez.“Then you’ve got someone like Beauxis who is prone to a howler here and there but is butter smooth. He just walks in, clips it, breaks the rules of convention a little bit, coming round the corner and falling away from the ball. But it’s all about sweet timing like any sport. Those who time the ball the best seem to almost move the slowest. Lack of clutter makes a beautiful goal-kicker for me.”Current Edinburgh assistant and former sharpshooter Duncan Hodge repeats one name, but also offers additional thoughts on the importance of looking good. “With coaching input I reckon the old school, languid, round-the-corner, flowing kickers are less (evident today). For example, there are no more Dominguezes about really.“Kids watch more and are coached more, so are much better technically. That mean fewer natural or nice-to-watch kickers going about, in my opinion. But there’s no point in looking good if you can’t get the job done or get results.”Simply wanting their kickers to get the ball between the sticks time after time is a desire that unites all coaches. When asked if beauty is important, Premiership legend Charlie Hodgson says that it’s results that matter, then rattles through a checklist of factors that are key to success, regardless of how pleasing on the eye the technique is.He points out that there is no ‘one size fits all’ approach to kicking. He believes that the basics of approach, with contact off the foot and following through, are key. “Quade Cooper’s matador approach (towards the ball) looked doomed from the start!” he says. He adds that top kickers are able to “self-correct” in high-pressure situations because they know their own technique so forensically.In any conditions: Charlie Hodgson in Rome, 2012 (Getty Images)Coach after coach talks of the art of simplicity too.Coming back to this, Grayson explains that the more idiosyncratic you are in preparation, the more issues that arise. “As a technical kicker, Wilko (Jonny Wilkinson) was beautiful to watch. The whole build-up is a tortured soul getting to the point where he’s ready to pull the trigger. All those little bits of external demonstrations – which are affirmations to yourself – the cupping of your hands, dragging your feet, trying to find the feel and all that adds into something… His style is great because he owned it and everyone since has copied it, but (for them) it all adds up to a load of mess.“His actual kicking of the ball is not that different for everybody. The mechanics are pretty much the same.“In terms of technique and coaching people: what are you good at? What can you do? What feels natural? I approach it from what feels natural. Now how can we hardwire that and make it more reliable through understanding your own technique? It’s potentially tweaking certain things, but that’s more about preparation, mental process and everything else versus ‘stop doing that, it’s not right.’“Because if you can get in between the posts any way you can, I don’t care. If you’re kicking at 90% and you do it by turning your back on the ball and jumping up and down five times, then toe bungin’ it, I really don’t care as long as it goes through the middle of the posts.“So there is no right way, there is no wrong way.”There is potentially a world of nuance within this, though. Some kicks are like a signature, but you can understand why youngsters may want to try to forge that. Vlok Cilliers, the South African coach currently working with France’s kickers, advises young players never to fall into the trap of trying to “copy and paste” another player’s style. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

What it’s like to be a rugby chaplain

first_imgFormer second-row Martin Lewis has been chaplain at Cardiff Blues for more than a decade. He tells RW about his work behind the scenes at the Guinness Pro14 club LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Rugby pilgrimage: Martin Lewis watches Namibia at the 2011 Rugby World Cup in New Zealand Feeding the homeless: ex-Blues coach John Mulvihill and others from the club prepare food (Cardiff Blues)The issues that players face are many and complex. They can surround identity – being seen only as a rugby player instead of as a person. The uncertainty of selection or the public ‘shame’ of being dropped. Injury is a dark tunnel that affects nearly every player at some point. Bereavements, divorce and family health also crop up regularly.“There was one lad who was very worried his mum had cancer. He jumped to that ‘she’s going to die’ and that became a real mindset challenge.”Addiction is another topic that Lewis is used to discussing all too frequently. “Online gambling is one of the biggest issues. It’s reckoned that gambling on your phone gives the same sort of buzz as when you’re playing. You can help that person, and the coach doesn’t need to know because playing on the Saturday may well be their outlet.“But you’ve got to look at what wider damage is going on. It could be that their marriage is at risk because their partner doesn’t know. Then it’s a slippery slide, what about the house?“Because a lot of gambling, if they’re coming to talk about it, isn’t just an occasional flutter, often there’s big debt behind it. From my banking days I’ve had enough people in my office in tears because somebody’s about to sell the house or their marriage has fallen apart and they just don’t know what to do.Charity work: Blues U16s load a lorry with boxes destined for a poverty-hit nation (Blues)“We’re not saying we’ve got every answer but we can help signpost people to specialists. And what we promise is that we’ll keep walking with that person. We’re not going to leave them.”Overseas players – South Africans, Maoris, Pacific Islanders – are generally far keener on having faith support. Lewis recounts with satisfaction his experiences with the Namibia team at the 2011 World Cup in New Zealand, when each of the 20 finalists was allocated a chaplain. He was there with the charity Engage.“I had a wonderful time with the Namibians. They are an incredibly spiritual nation, a lot of the guys were saying to me, ‘Mart, can you take me to church? Can we have a Bible study, can we have a prayer time?’ That for me was the whole package of chaplaincy because it was both strands. I went everywhere with them, I’m half Namibian now!”Converted: he loved his time with Namibia at RWC 2011, where all 20 teams were allocated a chaplainSubsequent RWC hosts, England and Japan, chose not to offer that level of chaplaincy support but Lewis hopes France will recognise the benefits and put something in place for 2023.“Sport, and rugby, can learn from having people come in from outside and seeing life in a different way. That’s the value of what we bring. We come with a slightly different skill-set and view of the world into that insular bubble, so we see things that others don’t always spot.“I’ve had the odd coach say to me, ‘Well, we’ve let that lad down, haven’t we? I don’t know how we’ve missed that’. To think that we’ve kept people from suicide or what have you. If you only did that once in your life, that’s a huge thing, isn’t it?”This article was originally published in the February 2021 issue of Rugby World. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. TAGS: Cardiff Blues What it’s like to be a rugby chaplainIt’s tempting to say that you wouldn’t notice a rugby club chaplain as he or she goes about their business quietly and unobtrusively, offering words of support to any in need of comfort. But it’s difficult to miss the 6ft 7in former second-row that is Martin Lewis, chaplain at Cardiff Blues. He is an imposing figure in many ways.Lewis, 57, played 400 first-class rugby games over 12 years – for Penarth, Bridgend and Abertillery – before a snapped ACL ended his playing career at the age of 42.Playing days: the 1984-85 Penarth team, with second-row Lewis easy to spot in the middle of the back rowHe had a Christian faith from a young age, so when he was asked if he’d like to replace Ian Rees as the Blues’ chaplain he accepted the challenge with alacrity. He recently passed ten years in the voluntary role.What started as strolling up the touchline at academy games, talking to parents or injured players, evolved into ‘Chat with the chaplain’, where young players could take 20 minutes out of training to get problems off their chest. Then Lewis’s role escalated further, embracing the club’s senior players too.“I started alongside people like Dillon Lewis, Jarrod Evans, Liam Belcher, who are now all first-team regulars,” says Lewis, who retired from a banking career five years ago.“I’d wander into the gym and Sam Warburton would come out of the corner, ‘Good to see you, Mart’, just be available to people if they wanted a chat. Or some would say ‘Can we meet for a coffee?’ and you would meet them away from the training facility.Leading Blue: Jarrod Evans is among those Lewis has known for a number of years (Athena Pictures/Getty)“What we offer is that non-judgemental, impartial listening ear, totally confidential, unless of course there are safeguarding issues. We’ve got this tagline, ‘Pastorally proactive, spiritually reactive’. We’re not there to Bible bash but try to be the hands and feet of Jesus.”Lewis is a member of Sports Chaplaincy UK, a charity with 600 chaplains across the UK, of which 55 work in rugby union. Invariably it’s a voluntary role and a labour of love. In Wales there have been two or three chaplains at every pro region – Lewis’s wife works with Blues’ mixed ability team, Cardiff Chiefs. More than half the English Premiership clubs have one too.DID YOU KNOW? Sports Chaplaincy UK (formerly SCORE) was founded in 1991 by John Boyers, who was chaplain at Watford FC and later Man Utd. It provides spiritual and pastoral care to every level of sport, free of charge. For more info, see sportschaplaincy.org.uk“We provide chaplaincy support at pro level down to grass roots. We’re growing all the time in terms of rugby across Wales. We had a club that held off, understood chaplaincy but weren’t sure. They had a suicide the other week and said please come. Suicide seems to be a real problem in South Wales, particularly across our rugby clubs, which is really concerning.Here to help: with a booklet from Sports Chaplaincy UK“The other day I bumped into Gerald Davies, now chairman of the Pro14. He said I’ve heard about you at a meeting, it’s fantastic, we need to have more of you. Trying to get that endorsement from the WRU is a big step for us.”It’s not just a sympathetic ear that Lewis provides. He might hold a remembrance service, perhaps scatter a fan’s ashes on the pitch.He took the service for former Bridgend team-mate Gareth Williams, the ex-Wales and Lions back-row, who he visited every few weeks during his dreadful MSA illness. And he’s involved in community work too, with Blues players helping to feed homeless people in Cardiff at his behest.last_img read more

Chicago Consultation’s statement on transgender inclusion

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Posted Jul 10, 2012 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Chicago Consultation’s statement on transgender inclusion The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN General Convention, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH [Chicago Consultation] The Chicago Consultation issued this statement today from its co-convener, the Rev. Lowell Grisham:“During our long journey toward the full inclusion of lesbian and gay Christians in the life of the church, Episcopalians have slowly come to accept that God made us in more varieties than typical “masculine” men and “feminine” women and have begun to respond to this insight by dealing more justly with previously marginalized and stigmatized transgender people.“Today the Episcopal Church affirmed the human dignity of a deeply stigmatized population that is far too often victim to discrimination, bullying and abuse. We will no longer turn a blind eye to the violence and rejection suffered by transgender people. Now our clergy and lay leaders can represent the breadth of our church and serve as agents of welcome to all of God’s people.”The Chicago Consultation, a group of Episcopal and Anglican bishops, clergy and lay people, supports the full inclusion of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Christians in the Episcopal Church and the worldwide Anglican Communion. To learn more about the Chicago Consultation, visit www.chicagoconsultation.org. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Human Sexuality Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR last_img read more

New Zealand: Deconstruction of Christchurch Cathedral must wait

first_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By Taonga staffPosted Nov 15, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Tagscenter_img New Zealand: Deconstruction of Christchurch Cathedral must wait Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Anglican Taonga] The High Court has halted the deconstruction of Christchurch’s severely damaged cathedral – but only until the Church Property Trustees produce plans and commit to building a new Cathedral in the Square.The style of the new cathedral will be left to CPT.Furthermore, the court has ordered that CPT should make “reasonable speed” in building the new cathedral.Late this afternoon Justice Lester Chisholm handed down its long-awaited decision on whether CPT could continue with its plans to reduce the iconic neo-gothic cathedral to around 2m.This had been opposed by a group called the Great Christchurch Buildings Trust, which is co-chaired by former MPs Jim Anderton and Philip Burdon.They had sought a binding court ruling on whether the deconstruction breached an Act of Parliament protecting church buildings.That action appears, in the long run, to have failed.Justice Chisholm rules in his written judgment that the church is not legally required to restore the cathedral to its original form.“Unless the terms of the cathedral trust are varied, either the structure that remains will have to be repaired or it will have to be replaced by another cathedral,” he says.“While there must be a cathedral on the site, it does not necessarily have to replicate the cathedral as it stood before the earthquakes occurred.”However, the judge also rules “the future of the cathedral is legitimately in the public arena and is plainly a matter of intense public interest”.In a letter to her diocese this afternoon, Bishop Victoria Matthews said she was pleased that the church’s decision to deconstruct had been confirmed by the judge.She acknowledged that the church had to assure the court of its commitment to build a new cathedral in the Square before proceeding further with the deconstruction.“As we have said since March, the new design will be a mixture of old and new, and it will be beautiful,” she added.‘Complexities’The High Court decision acknowledges the complexities that CPT grappled with in reaching its decision.“Everyone agrees that the decision facing the CPT was difficult,” the judgement says.“The timeframe was tight (this is not a criticism of CERA); complex engineering and other issues needed to be assessed; there were many competing considerations; and whatever option was chosen, a large shortfall in the funds required to complete the project seemed to be inevitable.“The trust remained a trust for the erection of ‘a Cathedral’.“No term requiring a particular style, for example gothic, was imposed on the trustee.“Any suggestion that the purpose of the trust is to preserve the Cathedral indefinitely is inaccurate and unrealistic.”CPT and the diocesan standing committee will now consider all aspects of the 200-paragraph decision, pending a judicial review of the church’s plans.Bishop Victoria said: “The architectural firm Warren and Mahoney have already been engaged to work on design, and we completed the study tour with the architects in the middle of year.”• Download the full judgement: Great Christchurch Buildings Trust v Church Property Trustees .pdf Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more

Pope Benedict’s contributions to Christian unity

first_img Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [World Council of Churches — Press Release] The World Council of Churches (WCC) general secretary Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit expressed “profound thanks” on 27 February for the ministry and witness of Pope Benedict XVI as he officially completed his service as head of the Catholic Church. Pope Benedict had announced his departure earlier in the month, effective 28 February. Pope Benedict’s contributions to Christian unity Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Posted Feb 28, 2013 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ecumenical & Interreligious “On the occasion of your resignation from the Apostolic See of Rome and the Petrine ministry, we in the ecumenical movement pause to recall your many contributions to the life of the Church and the world, and to wish you well as your ministry of prayer and meditation continues,” said Tveit in his letter.Remembering Benedict’s engagement with the WCC Commission on Faith and Order as a Catholic professor of theology in 1971, Tveit honoured Benedict’s contributions to Christian unity.“In looking from an ecumenical perspective over your entire service to the church, the World Council of Churches is grateful for your devotion to the quest for Christian unity as a pattern for the unity of all humanity,” he stated.In his letter, Tveit mentioned Benedict’s “partnership in ministry” from which, he said, the WCC has benefited. He also expressed thanks for the pope’s support to Catholic representatives in WCC events, the Joint Working Group between the Roman Catholic Church and the WCC, the Faith and Order Commission, the Commission on World Mission and Evangelism, as well as in independent initiatives such as the Global Christian Forum.Remembering his meetings with Benedict XVI in Rome, 2010, and at the Day of Prayer for Peace in the World in Assisi, 2011, Tveit said, “Our conversations have left me with a conviction of the importance of strengthening already strong relations that enable Christians of many backgrounds to pray together, work together and rededicate ourselves to unity in faith.”Read WCC general secretary’s letter to Pope Benedict XVIMore information on cooperation between the WCC and the VaticanThe World Council of Churches promotes Christian unity in faith, witness and service for a just and peaceful world. An ecumenical fellowship of churches founded in 1948, today the WCC brings together 349 Protestant, Orthodox, Anglican and other churches representing more than 560 million Christians in over 110 countries, and works cooperatively with the Roman Catholic Church. The WCC general secretary is Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit, from the [Lutheran] Church of Norway. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more