Rugby Book Review – For the Glory

first_imgBUY IT AT:  amazon.co.uk RRP:  £16.99  PUBLISHED BY:  JR BooksGot a rugby book or DVD you’d like us to review in the Armchair Zone? Email [email protected] article appeared in the November 2009 issue of Rugby World Magazine Rudy Scholz closes down France’s Henri Galau during the infamous 1924 final TWO YEARS ago we reported on the interwar USA rugby team, which won back-to-back Olympic gold medals despite the fact many of the team were strangers to the game, writes Rugby World deputy editor Alan Pearey. Now Mark Ryan has delved deeper to add flesh to this extraordinary story (albeit that they had only France to beat in 1920, and only France and Romania as opponents four years later).Ryan’s tale revolves around shy farmer Babe Slater and brash lawyer Rudy Scholz, who emerged as key figures in the American side that felled France 17-3 in the 1924 final in Paris. It was probably the dirtiest rugby match ever played, skipper Slater repeatedly pleading with the Welsh referee to NOT send off a succession of Frenchmen for dastardly deeds. Slater reasoned that his team’s very lives would be endangered by any dismissals, such was the fury of a crowd that, already anti-American in sentiment because of political tensions between the two nations, had been angered by the visitors’ complaints about poor treatment in preceding weeks – the USA team had even formed a scrum to take on French immigration officials! When the Americans then shocked the French in the Olympic final, the anger in the stands spilled over, a number of American spectators being attacked and hospitalized.Pierre de Coubertin, the IOC president, was in the crowd that shameful day and rugby was thrown out of the Olympic movement. On 9 October 2009, the IOC officially voted to admit rugby (sevens) back into the Games – and this time the French better keep their cool. Still, it might have been worse: one event considered for the 1920 Games in Antwerp was… grenade-throwing.Check out the recovered video of the 1924 final…RW RATING 4/5 TAGS: Book Review Do you want to buy the issue of Rugby World in which this article appeared? Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipcOr perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Victoria Pretti called as rector of St. Mary’s, Stone Harbor,…

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop William H. Stokes of New Jersey will lead a “Celebration of New Ministry” on Saturday, Nov. 8, for the Rev. Victoria Pretti, as she formally assumes her duties as rector of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Stone Harbor. The service will begin at 11 a.m. at the church, which is located at 95th Street and Third Avenue.Pretti, or “Mother Victoria” as she prefers to be called, was selected by a Search Committee last March following a nationwide search process. She succeeds the Rev. John Sosnowski, who served as St. Mary’s rector for nearly 15 years and was well known throughout the county. The Rev. Susan Osborne-Mott was interim rector during the search process.“I am delighted to begin this new journey with God’s people at St. Mary’s in Stone Harbor,” said Pretti. “This is a very special place filled with people who are joyfully serious about living the Gospel of Jesus Christ. I am eager to work with our wonderful parish members, my colleagues in ministry, and the people of Stone Harbor and those throughout Cape May County to proclaim the Gospel in both word and action.”Formerly the vicar of the Episcopal Church of Our Saviour in Milton, Massachusetts, and All Saints Episcopal Church in West Newbury, Massachusetts, Pretti also has many years of experience in the fields of healthcare and social services. She was previously on staff at Boston’s Pine Street Inn, one of New England’s largest homeless shelters and social service organizations. It was this background that made her particularly attractive to St. Mary’s, which has over the past 10 years established an active outreach ministry.“We feel truly blessed to have been able to find someone like Mother Victoria to help us in trying to realize God’s call to us,” said Lawrence Schmidt, senior warden of St. Mary’s. “She has many outstanding gifts and together we believe we can do great service in Christ’s name.”Pretti is married to Anthony Pretti. She and her husband moved from Boston to Cape May County in June and have been residing in Cape May Court House while renovations are undertaken at the parish rectory. Press Release Service Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Posted Oct 30, 2014 Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA People An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Victoria Pretti called as rector of St. Mary’s, Stone Harbor, New Jersey Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH last_img read more

Canadian primate offers initial thoughts about Canterbury meeting

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. January 15, 2016 at 10:18 pm I hope the Canadians do not cave in to homophobia and hatred Posted Jan 15, 2016 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Anglican Communion, January 17, 2016 at 1:41 pm Tolerance is a two way street. The liberal wing of the Church has not been Tolerant of the Conservatives. If the Pro-Gay marriage crowd believes in tolerance. They should welcome those that oppose them, and stop trying to kick them out. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Margaret Sjoholm-Franks says: Doug Kerr says: Rector Knoxville, TN Primates Meeting 2016 reaction AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Janice Schattman says: Frank Hower says: January 16, 2016 at 9:16 pm Janice, thank you so much for that note. It is just what you speak of in Texas – not just in parts of The Episcopal Church (and certainty the current [real] Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth is extraordinarily inclusive and welcoming), but as well in government and many other aspects – that was a major factor in Carla’s and my decision, in early 2012, to move from Weatherford, Texas to Alamogordo, New Mexico.Notwithstanding the inconvenient and irritating wreckage left behind, Jack Iker’s leaving The Episcopal Church was one of the best things to happen to it. Carla and I, incidentally, were among the founders of The Episcopal Church in Parker County, which held its first full-blown Episcopal Mass (with all the bells and whistles, to make a bad pun) the very day after Iker and his band left The Episcopal Church, emptying the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth of its infestation of poison and evil.I do not believe that the Anglican Communion has anything that The Episcopal Church needs. If it were up to me, I would have The Episcopal Church withdraw from the Anglican Communion.Now, to esteemed Bishop Hilz: Hold firm. You are on the right path. Doug Kerr says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments (19) Featured Events Ivan Garcia says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH January 16, 2016 at 4:24 pm I hope the Canadians will join with us in the US and stop the hate and stand up against the Global South. Rector Tampa, FL January 18, 2016 at 10:21 am PERFECT. It seems to be a new version of the perennial fight pro and against Rome: nothing new in the “Body of Christ.” January 18, 2016 at 10:27 am I must emphasize that the majority vote is the common essential of democratic practices around the world: you don’t need a landslide vote in the decision-making processes.In trying to offer a possibility to your question, ” If I left the Episcopal Church, Lord, where would I go?”, don’t worry that you will not end in hell. Thereare many, but many other alternatives, including the Roman-Catholic Church … Janice Schattman says: Steven Keenan says: Primates Meeting, January 18, 2016 at 10:37 am Tolerance is an empty description here. Some in my congregation tried desperately for 20 years to keep our little family together in the face of virulent disagreement. What we achieved at best was a covered-dish and small talk society. At worst it was hateful, two-faced back biting with individuals being denounced in the service. ERD could not be mentioned as outreach because it was associated with the National Church. Better for children to starve than allow an apostate organization any credit for humanity. Calling for tolerance is inadequate to that level of division. At some point, it dilutes the mission to stay together. January 18, 2016 at 10:11 am As disappointed as I am with the Anglican Communion, the ECUSA is leading, not being left behind. I would love to know how the vote broke down. After all, it only took a majority, not a landslide. I am pretty sure about most of Africa and South America. Did Canada, Australia, England, Mexico, South Africa vote for or against us? Is this the West against the Third World? The wealthy provinces against the poor? Suffering the sanctions graciously is a far cry from reversing the courageous position we have taken one of the great moral issue of our day. Continuing to turn our wealth to aid the impoverished, despite the contempt of their church’s leadership, is not cowardice. If I left the Episcopal Church, Lord, where would I go? Janice Schattman says: January 18, 2016 at 10:17 am NO. They will join TEC in the new Anglican schism. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Janice Schattman says: Mary L La Fond says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC [Anglican Church of Canada] Anglican Church of Canada Archbishop Fred Hiltz, one of the 38 primates who gathered Jan. 11-15 in Canterbury, England, has released the following statement about the Primates Meeting.An Initial Statement from the Primate concerning the Primates Meeting in CanterburyHaving met this week in Canterbury, England, the Primates of the Anglican Communion committed–even in the face of deep differences of theological conviction concerning same sex marriage–to walk together and not apart. Our conversations reflected the truth that, while the Anglican Communion is a family of autonomous churches in communion with the see of Canterbury, we live by the long-held principle of ‘mutual responsibility and inter dependence in the Body of Christ’. While our relationships are most often characterized by mutual support and encouragement, there are times when we experience stress and strain and we know our need for the grace of God to be patient with each other. Such was the experience of the primates this week.We struggled with the fragility of our relations in response to the actions taken by the General Convention of The Episcopal Church in changing its canon on marriage, making provision for the blessing of same sex marriages. We talked, prayed and wrestled with the consequences considered by the meeting. Some of us wept.Through this whole conversation I was deeply mindful that our church will deal with the first reading of a proposed change of a similar kind in our canon on marriage at General Synod in July 2016. There is no doubt in my mind that the action of the Primates’ meeting will weigh into our deliberations. On this matter I shall not comment further just now, as I intend to write some reflections for release on Monday January 18, 2016. They will speak not only to the issue of same sex marriage, but also the host of other critical global issues discussed in our meeting.For now I ask for your prayers for all of the primates as they make their way home. I know some are returning to very challenging situations beset with extreme poverty, civil war, religiously motivated violence and the devastating effects of climate change.This week reminded me once again of the servant style of leadership required of the primates of the Churches of The Anglican Communion. As Jean Vanier reminded us in his reflections at our closing Eucharist, we are called to be the face of Jesus in this world. Pray with me that all of us be faithful in this calling.The Most Rev. Fred Hiltz Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virginia Gambill says: January 21, 2016 at 12:12 pm My apologies to Archbishop Hiltz for my editorial errors in your title and the spelling of your name!Best regards,Doug Kerr Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC January 17, 2016 at 1:27 am The ECUSA now has a badge of honor with the “punishment” it incurred at Canterbury. The ECUSA should simple say, “We were finally forced to leave an organization controlled by homophobic bishops who care little for the compassion we are directed to show to others by our Lord Jesus Christ. Fairwell, and we will be happy to replace the Anglican Communion with a new organization including the American Episcopal Church, Scottish Episcopal Church and hopefully the Anglican Church in Canada, Australia and New Zealand as well in the future.” Leading is never easy…but it is an honor and blessing placed on us now by God. We must not waiver in the face of so much malice. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI January 18, 2016 at 11:32 am I do not love the strife but it has historical counterparts. The first great controversy in the new church was whether gentiles were okay. The law was clear. We weren’t. St. Paul spent his life advocating for his gentiles and eunuchs with St. James the Just and the church in Jerusalem. A new understanding, a new vision of what is unclean was the only alternative to schism. They both died martyr’s deaths just the same. They might be embarrassed in heaven by their earthly views but they won’t be damned. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem William Flint says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Janice Schattman says: Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 January 18, 2016 at 10:19 am I love this WAR between Episcopalians and Anglicans: it’s so typically Christian! Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC January 16, 2016 at 9:43 am My husband and I raised four children in North Texas, where even Episcopalians can be Bronze-Age homophobes. Our oldest daughter is the most talented and was the most devout of our children. She did well in school, had many friends and admirers but no real boyfriend. I just thought she was a strong personality who hadn’t met her match. When she came out to us in her 20s, I cried for days–first from relief. It explained so much. Then from guilt at how lonely and frightened she must have been all those years. She was a church musician and dynamite youth director in the Diocese of Dallas until it somehow got back to Iker that she was lesbian. That evil man intervened in another diocese to prevent her from blessing Happening with her talent and ultimately cost her her job. Within a month, we were loading her modest belongings into a U-Haul so she could move to British Columbia and begin seminary. She and her wife, also Episcopal, were married in Canada, recognized under Canadian law and blessed in a Canadian church. They live in Southern California now and will never be back to Texas. The Ikerite faction in the congregation I raised my children in locked the vestry and choir out of the church at Christmas because we did not hate women and gays like they do. Still, I told myself it was an aberration in the ECUSA. That equanimity is hard to maintain in the face of scolding, now active sanctions from the Anglican Communion and calls for patience with it. This so called “communion” has no value to me. Communing with ignorance, hatred and bigotry is not a virtue. If Canada goes the way of the loons, I will lose my religion. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA January 18, 2016 at 2:41 pm The homophobes as the left calls them have scripture on their side. It is not even close to debatable. Name calling by the left does not change the word of God. Homosexuals are part of the body of Christ. Heterosexuals and homosexuals both commit sin according to God when they have sex outside of marriage. Unfortunately for the left, Christ explicitly defined marriage between a man and woman (probably knowing in the future that today’s radical left would try to normalize same sex marriage). The logical end for a homosexual is that your life is to be lived as celibate. That is not easy of course, but it is God’s challenge. You might not like it right now because you do not have the wisdom of God. But follow His word, and do not try to run away from it. It will only cause you further strife in your journey through life. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA January 17, 2016 at 9:47 am We too have our share of homophobic, white privileged, parishioners here in Massachusetts, this is the Episcopal Church after all. I agree, either lead or be left behind. At this point the church seems to have chosen the later. January 19, 2016 at 12:12 am I keep hearing the word tolerance….that is anethma to fre thinkers. I should be abandoned in favor of the word ACCEPTANCE…once all are accepted, the fire and anger of good men will be changed to the warmth of love. Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group January 18, 2016 at 10:50 am I thank you for your suggestion. I’m sorry. I did not make myself clear. I ardently support the ECUSA in full inclusion of women and gays. Although I admire Pope Francis, the Roman Catholic Church is just a larger and more rigid bastion of the views I deplore. There are dissenting Catholics who share my moral position; many of them fallen away. You do not convert to an religion to join the dissent. As I say for all of us, charity will be the ultimate measuring stick of all theologies. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ernie Hammel says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ivan Garcia says: Michael Grear says: Ivan Garcia says: Ivan Garcia says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA January 19, 2016 at 5:41 pm While some seem to forget we are all God’s children, made in the image and likeness of God, it will behoove us to remember love is stronger than hate. This is not the first time differences have occurred between the Anglican Communion and the American Episcopal Church. So many entirely diverse cultures are represented by the 38 primates, it is impossible for an average American or even an above average American to make sense of what s really going on at this stage at the Anglican Communion, I personally will be happy to leave it to our very gifted and talented presiding bishop Michael Curry who can guide us through this maze of heated discussions and determinations of possible outcomes. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canadian primate offers initial thoughts about Canterbury meeting Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more

Young Anglicans challenge the global church to protect the environment

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Advocacy Peace & Justice, Anglican Communion, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC ACC16, Youth & Young Adults Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC [Anglican Communion News Service] Bishops around the world should plant a tree every time they do a confirmation or baptism – that was one of the suggestions put to the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby by a group of young Anglicans from Central and Southern Africa as they discussed discipleship and environment. The suggestion emerged as the young people spent an afternoon with Archbishop Welby as part of their week-long conference ahead of the Anglican Consultative Council meeting in Lusaka.Fifty young people from South Africa, Swaziland, Lesotho, Angola, Namibia, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Malawi and Botswana are taking part in the conference, which has been sponsored by the UK-based Christian development agency Tearfund.Archbishop Welby was joined at the conference by the Archbishop of Central Africa, Albert Chama. Together, they listened to presentations from the young Christians on issues including renewable energy, mining, deforestation, land erosion, farming practices, waste, water, and air pollution. Some of these took the form of oral presentations while others used drama and song to get their message across.One group of young people put the Archbishop on a tight spot when they incorporated him into their drama – as the story unfolded, a young person playing the part of a farmer argued that the Archbishop would agree that he was entitled to chop down all his trees because the Bible said that the Earth was man’s to subdue.Archbishop Welby replied, “No!” before another participant explained that this was exactly the response that they were looking for – and they wanted more church leaders to speak up for the environment.Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby with the Revd Dr Rachel Mash, environmental coordinator for the Anglican Church of Southern Africa with some of the youth participants at the environment and discipleship conference in Lusaka. Photo: Gavin Drake/Anglican Communion News ServiceThe youth conference will conclude tomorrow with a Eucharist led by Archbishop Chama. Two of the young people will then be sent from the youth conference to the Anglican Consultative Council meeting (ACC-16) which gets underway in Lusaka’s Cathedral of the Holy Cross tomorrow (Friday), to present the young people’s ideas to the wider Anglican Communion.One of them is Cathrine Ngangira from the Diocese of Harare in Zimbabwe. She was part of a group that had been looking at deforestation. As that group made their presentation to the Archbishops, she outlined plans for a “100-Day Campaign for a New Green World.” This included a range of activities from tree planting to releasing a pop song to get the message across.The campaign was intended merely as an illustration for the conference, but Cathrine Ngangira said she is determined to put them into practice. “The ideas came out of this conference but I have already had a chat with our environment chaplain and I said that this doesn’t have to end just like that,” she told ACNS.“We are now making sure that this movement really becomes something that we can put into action. And as soon as we go back to the diocese we are going to really start the 100 Day Campaign of the New Green World.”She added: “There is a calling that God is calling us to do. There is a change that we really have to see in this world and it has to come with us. I always say to my colleagues: ‘be part of the change that you want to see’. And today marks a new beginning of another change – not just in Harare Diocese, or Zimbabwe, but worldwide.“We are now going to be part of the change that we want to see.” Cathrine Ngangira from the Diocese of Harare calls for 100 Days of Action for a New Green World. Photo: Gavin Drake/Anglican Communion News ServiceAfter the presentations, Archbishop Welby addressed the young people ahead of a question and answer session. He began by saying that with old age comes declining eyesight, and that without his glasses “I can’t really see you – you just become a fuzzy mess in front of me.”He likened this to what was going on “in much of the richer parts of the world” where “people look but they don’t see. . . That applies particularly to the environment.”He said that if they were to do the same presentations to members of the British House of Lords – the upper house of the UK Parliament – “many of them would say: ‘it’s not like that’, ‘you don’t understand’, ‘you’ve exaggerated it’, or ‘it won’t happen in our lifetimes’”.He added that “it is not a new problem” and likened it to the situation in the Church at Laodicea in the Book of Revelation: “You say, ‘I am rich: I have acquired wealth and do not need a thing.’ But you do not realise that you are wretched, pitiful, poor, blind and naked.”Archbishop Welby continued: “In other words, what they saw was not the reality. They did not see the reality. They saw a fake. They saw what they wanted to see. . . Now when it comes to the environment, this is exactly what is happening.“All over the world, people look around and say ‘it’s really okay. It’s just a slightly hot summer’ or ‘it’s slightly bad rainy season – I remember my grandfather said there was a slightly bad rainy season from time to time. It’s okay. It’s just weather changes. Nobody can predict the weather. We’re okay’, or ‘yes, okay, this strip mining is producing lakes full of polluted water where you get fish that are poisonous if you get fish at all. . . but it will all go away. There isn’t a problem.’“They see what they expect to see. Not what they should see. And part of the prophetic role of the Church is to say ‘don’t just see what you expect to see; see the reality. And what you are doing is saying ‘look at the reality.’”He encouraged the young people to become servants of Christ, serving the world; saying that, as a Church, “We prophecy better when we kneel at someone’s feet than when we’re standing in a pulpit.” The Archbishop of Central Africa, Albert Chama, listens as Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby addresses young southern African Anglicans at an environmental and discipleship conference in Lusaka. Photo: Gavin Drake/Anglican Communion News ServiceLater, responding to questions from the young people, he told them: “You are the Church of today, and the leaders of tomorrow. And tomorrow may not be far away.”Naomi Foxwood, who works in the global advocacy department of Tearfund, explained that the agency had sponsored the conference because of their “passion to see the global church mobilised on issues of environment and poverty.”She told ACNS: “We think that the Church has the potential to be absolutely transformative in a way that no other institution does. Firstly, because we have God and his power to do immeasurably more than we can ask or imagine; second because we have reach; and thirdly because we have a lot of passion, particularly among our young people.”The young people invited to take part in the conference were already engaged in environmental campaigns in their local churches. One of the participants had set themselves a target of planting 1,000 trees by the end of the year, and had told Naomi Foxwood that “I’ve got to 850 so I’ll think I’ll exceed my target.”She said that the strength of the programme was that the young participants were no longer working individually but had become part of an international network. “That’s how you build a movement,” she said, “lots of individual local actions being connected, having momentum and growing into something bigger.“For young adults to see that the leadership of the Anglican Church, right up to the Archbishop, takes them seriously as youth; and takes our God-mandated obligation to care for the environment seriously – it just fuels them. I think they are going to out of here absolutely empowered, inspired and even more passionate.” Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Anglican Consultative Council, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY By Gavin DrakePosted Apr 8, 2016 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Environment & Climate Change, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Young Anglicans challenge the global church to protect the environment Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

Líderes mundiales adoptan convenio sobre la migración global

first_img Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Refugees Migration & Resettlement Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Advocacy Peace & Justice, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Por Lynette WilsonPosted Sep 19, 2016 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] Un grupo de líderes mundiales se reunieron en la sede de las Naciones Unidas el 19 de septiembre para adoptar la Declaración de Nueva York, un documento que compromete a los países del mundo a proteger los derechos de refugiados y migrantes y a compartir la responsabilidad por el número récord de personas desplazadas.“La cumbre de hoy representa un avance en nuestros esfuerzos colectivos para abordar los desafíos de la movilidad humana”, dijo el secretario general de las Naciones Unidas, Ban Ki-moon, luego que se adoptara la declaración.La adopción de la declaración por parte de los países significará, dijo él, que “más niños puedan asistir a la escuela, que más trabajadores puedan buscar con seguridad empleo en el extranjero, en lugar de estar a merced de contrabandistas criminales, y que más personas tendrán opciones reales de mudarse una vez que termine el conflicto, se mantenga la paz y aumenten las oportunidades en sus países de origen”.La cumbre de la asamblea general de la ONU fue la primera reunión de jefes de Estado y de gobierno que aborda los grandes desplazamientos de refugiados y migrantes, al objeto de unir a los países detrás de un enfoque más humano y coordinado.La totalidad de los 193 estados miembros de la ONU llegaron a un consenso sobre la declaración a fin de elaborar para 2018 un convenio Global para la Migración Segura, Ordenada y Regular; garantizar una participación más equitativa de responsabilidad por la acogida y la ayuda a los refugiados del mundo; comprometerse a proteger los derechos humanos de todos los refugiados y migrantes independientemente de su estatus; y comprometerse a lanzar una campaña global para contrarrestar la xenofobia.Sin embargo, la verdadera labor comienza cuando los países completen e implementen los términos de la declaración.“Las Naciones Unidas ha invitado a la sociedad civil a este proceso y, como organización de carácter religioso, debemos seguir comprometidos con la comunidad global para garantizar que los estándares incluidos en la Declaración de Nueva York sobre Refugiados y Migrantes se ratifican realmente”, dijo Lacy Broemel, analista política sobre refugiados e inmigración de la Iglesia Episcopal, luego de que se adoptara la declaración. Broemel asistió a la cumbre como observadora en representación del obispo primado de la Iglesia Episcopal Michael Curry.“Los refugiados y los migrantes están experimentando abusos de derechos humanos, están siendo expulsados de sus hogares y están enfrentando ataques xenófobos y racistas alrededor del mundo. No podemos ignorar a personas que necesitan y merecen nuestra atención”, dijo ella. “La Iglesia Episcopal debe usar la Declaración de Nueva York para dedicarse a la Defensa Social con nuestros gobiernos locales, con otros episcopales y con los refugiados y migrantes mismos”.La Iglesia Episcopal se ha unido a una red de organizaciones no gubernamentales que instan a los estados miembros a poner en vigor la declaración.De los 21,3 millones de refugiados en el mundo actual, [sólo] el 1 por ciento podría ser reasentado. El Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados (ACNUR) calcula que 1,19 millones de refugiados necesitarán ser reasentados en 2017.El martes, 20 de septiembre, el presidente Barack Obama coauspiciará una Cumbre de Líderes sobre los Refugiados, junto con Canadá, Etiopía, Alemania, Jordania, México y Suecia. La cumbre de los líderes apelará a los gobiernos a comprometerse a reasentar mayores cuotas de refugiados.La delegación observadora en representación de Curry asistió a la cumbre del 19 de septiembre y aboga por los siguientes puntos:Alentar campañas y estrategias para contrarrestar la xenofobia y la discriminación y priorizar la creación de relaciones entre refugiados y migrantes y las comunidades que los acogen.Apoyar el reasentamiento como un componente fundamental de la responsabilidad compartida e instar a los estados miembros a incrementar el tamaño de los actuales programas de reasentamiento o establecer programas de reasentamiento si no tuvieran ninguno. Afirmar el objetivo de reasentar anualmente al menos el 10 por ciento de la población refugiada mundial.Apoyar el derecho al asilo y al debido proceso de todas las personas.Afirmar un enfoque de toda la sociedad que incluya a la sociedad civil y a las organizaciones de carácter religioso.Afirmar el principio de no “No dejar a nadie atrás” y del trato preferencial para los más vulnerables.El Ministerio Episcopal de Migración es una de las nueve agencias —más de la mitad de ellas de carácter religioso— que trabajan en asociación con el Departamento de Estado [de EE.UU.] para acoger y reasentar refugiados; este año, se espera que 85.000 refugiados, o nuevos estadounidenses, lleguen a Estados Unidos. En 2017, el número se espera que ascienda a 110.000 refugiados, un aumento de un 57 por ciento en [relación con] las llegadas desde 2015.“Las comunidades de fe participan en el reasentamiento porque reconocen que, en definitiva, los relatos que les han dado vida a su fe son relatos de su propia identidad, dijo Allison Duvall, directora de relaciones y participación eclesiásticas del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, quien también formó parte de la delegación. “Todos somos siempre personajes en los relatos de nuestra fe, y los relatos exigen que tomemos decisiones morales”.“Frente a la Sagrada Familia que huye del rey Herodes, ¿somos espectadores, somos culpables y cómplices? ¿O damos acogida? Las comunidades religiosas que toman la Escritura seriamente saben que la verdad de la Escritura no sólo es verdadera en el pasado. Y exige que tomemos una decisión moral respecto a qué papel desempeñamos”.A principios de agosto, el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración se unió a otras organizaciones no gubernamentales que atienden a refugiados y problemas de migración y derechos humanos en hacer pública una declaración instando a los líderes que se reúnen para la cumbre a afirmar unos cuantos principios básicos para garantizar que: todo refugiado pueda tener acceso al asilo libre de persecución; que a todo refugiado se le dará la oportunidad de una solución permanente a su difícil situación, a estar y a sentirse seguro, acogido, y en casa, sin tener que esperar años para [alcanzar] esa solución; y que todo refugiado, persona desplazada y migrante tiene derecho a los mismos derechos humanos que todos los demás.En todo el mundo, la guerra y la persecución han obligado a un total de 65,3 millones de personas a abandonar sus hogares, cuatro veces más que hace una década y la cifra más grande de personas desplazadas desde la segunda guerra mundial.Los actuales conflictos en Irak, Siria, África Oriental y en todas partes han dado lugar a un aumento del número de migrantes que busca asilo en Europa, Canadá y Estados Unidos. La mayoría de los refugiados vive en campamentos y ciudades de refugiados en el Oriente Medio y en África.“Los informes noticiosos con frecuencia resaltan las migraciones de refugiados a Europa y América del Norte, lo cual oscurece el hecho de que el 86 por ciento de los refugiados del mundo vive en países en desarrollo. En efecto, sólo ocho países albergan la mitad de los refugiados del mundo. “Y eso no es justo”, dijo Karen Koning AbuZayd, asesora especial del secretario general de Naciones Unidas, durante una actividad el 14 de septiembre —en el Centro Denominacional de la Iglesia Episcopal— auspiciada por el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración.Como promedio, la mitad de todos los refugiados pasa un cuarto de siglo en un campamento de refugiados antes de [encontrar] un reasentamiento; el ACNUR es responsable de 16,1 millones de refugiados, la mayoría de los cuales vive en África y en el Oriente Medio (Los otros 5,1 millones son palestinos refugiados registrados por el Organismo de Socorro y Obras de las Naciones Unidas).La cumbre tiene lugar no sólo en un momento de cifras récord de refugiados, sino también en un tiempo de creciente discriminación y violencia contra inmigrantes y migrantes. La crisis de refugiados ha avivado los movimientos nacionalistas a través de Europa, donde el temor al terrorismo y la xenofobia han hecho presa de las sociedades y han llevado a los gobiernos a tomar medidas restrictivas. La mismo ocurre, ciertamente, en parte de Estados Unidos, donde hay estados que han propuesto legislaciones ya para excluir a los refugiados de sus estados ya para debilitar el programa de reasentamiento del gobierno federal.“En Estados Unidos, la Iglesia Episcopal hace mucho que se ha comprometido con la obra de promoción [o defensa] social. La Declaración de Nueva York nos ofrece otra herramienta para instar a nuestros funcionarios electos a crear políticas humanas y compasivas [a favor de] la migración y los refugiados. Nuestra labor continúa porque estamos comprometidos a hacer nuestro mundo más semejante al que Dios concibe para nosotros”, dijo Broemel.— Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Líderes mundiales adoptan convenio sobre la migración global Una delegación del Obispo Primado asiste a la cumbre de la ONU sobre refugiados y migrantes Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

Our Lasting Tribute wins DMA 2004 innovation award

first_imgOur Lasting Tribute wins DMA 2004 innovation award Tagged with: Awards Consulting & Agencies Individual giving  24 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Our Lasting Tribute, the In Memoriam fundraising programme devised by direct marketing agency Whitewater, has won the excellence award for innovation at the Direct Marketing Association’s 2004 awards.Whitewater’s MD, Steve Andrews, accepted the award at a ceremony in London’s Portman Square last week. The awards are designed to celebrate success in the direct marketing industry and beyond. There were three categories: Innovation, People Development and Customer Relations: those shortlisted for awards came from a wide variety of industry sectors.Our Lasting Tribute was launched in February 2003 and has since developed undraising programmes for over 40 charity clients, both in the UK and the US. At the heart of its approach is the recognition that people are strongly motivated to pay tribute to loved ones they have lost, and that setting up a charity fund in memory of this person can be both therapeutic for the bereaved, as well as source of income for charities. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Howard Lake | 3 May 2004 | News Matthew Hunt, Head of Marketing and Development (UK), said: “It’s great that our approach to In Memoriam fundraising is not only working for our member charities, but also that an organisation like the DMA recognises that this is a truly innovative approach”. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Acorns Children’s Hospice uses SMS tool for Valentine’s appeal

first_imgAcorns Children’s Hospice uses SMS tool for Valentine’s appeal Tagged with: Digital Acorns Children’s Hospice is accepting donations by mobile phone for its Have a Heart Day on Valentine’s Day next month. London-based firm LUUP has set up a text-message site to help Acorns handle these text donations. There are a number of fundraising initiatives, with a suggested donation of £1, from wearing something red on February 14th through to sending Valentine messages on an Acorns’ heart-filled poster.The appeal has already secured the support of ITV Central Tonight’s newsreaders Bob Warman and Joanne Malin. Staff at the TV station will be wearing something red to work and will also hold a cake sale for staff at the station throughout the day. Advertisement  17 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 30 January 2007 | Newscenter_img Giving by mobile phone simply requires the supporter to register for the free service at www.luup.com. Until the end of February 2007 LUUP will add 20% to each first time donation of up to £25 for Acorns. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

It’s a Better Life without Oxfam

first_img An unusual way of promoting Oxfam, but one which contains some good messages and approaches. A world without Oxfam would be a better one, argues the video, because that would mean that poverty has been conquered.The video won the Student category in the 2011 D&AD Awards.The video and the mocked-up campaign it promotes focus on Oxfam staff, and there’s a humorous take from them on the charity’s past style of adverts and campaigns.The imaginary campaign itself features a website where the public can find out about the individual Oxfam staff working on projects around the world. They can even follow them via their social media accounts. You can read about their dreams of what they want to do and achieve once Oxfam has disappeared.It’s a quirky approach that won’t appeal to all, but congratulations to the students at the Miami Ad School, Madrid for coming up with it and winning the award.  37 total views,  1 views today  38 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Howard Lake | 22 June 2011 | News Tagged with: Humour Advertisement It’s a Better Life without Oxfam AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Investigate injuring of journalist by state press group boss

first_img to go further November 12, 2019 Find out more News Eleven organizations from civil society create the Forum on Information & Democracy, a structural response to information disorder Organisation RSF_en Follow the news on Tunisia Receive email alerts TunisiaMiddle East – North Africa September 14, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Investigate injuring of journalist by state press group boss TunisiaMiddle East – North Africa center_img Read in Arabic (بالعربية)Reporters Without Borders demands an immediate investigation into an incident in which the new director-general of a state press group reportedly deliberately injured one of the organization’s journalists.Lotfi Touati, director-general of the Dar Essabah publications group, was driving a car that injured journalist Khalil Hannachi in front of company headquarters in Tunis at midday on 13 September. The incident occurred as journalists were demonstrating to demand that Touati resign, citing interference with editorial independence. The prime minister appointed him in August.“We energetically condemn the apparent targeting of Khalil Hannachi,” said Christophe Deloire, the press freedom organization’s director general. “Nothing can justify Lotfi Touati’s behaviour, which cannot be tolerated under the rule of law.” A thorough investigation leading to sanctions for injuries to the journalist is essential, Deloire said.According to eyewitnesses contacted by Reporters Without Borders, Touati started up his car while Hannachi was standing in front of it. The car rammed Hannachi, dragging him as he clung to the hood for several hundred meters. He was thrown off when Touati suddenly hit the brake. The injured journalist was immediately hospitalized. Doctors said his condition was stable, but kept him under observation.For his part, Touati filed an official complaint against Hannachi, accusing him of deliberately throwing himself on the car in order to harm Touati’s reputation and force his resignation. Touati was not detained.The incident came amid an escalating conflict between Dar Essabah journalists and the group’s newly appointed chief. Protests have been under way since 21 August, focused on Touati’s attempted assumption of unilateral control of editorial policy. Only a few minutes before Hannachi was injured, Touati had moved to name Nourredine Achour the group’s daily newspaper editor. Achour has been editor of the weekly Essabah Hebdo.Touati had not consulted the newspaper’s staff. As a result, they gathered in front of the headquarters to demand his resignation – the most recent of several such demonstrations. They booed him as he walked out of the building, shouting “Get out!”Other events leading up to the confrontation included Touati’s pushing out on 27 August of Jamel Eddine Bourigua, one of the three top editors of the daily Essabah. Touati also published a list of people authorized to write editorials. On 29 August, he had security forces block the delivery of 15,000 copies of his own daily, on which a list of journalists’ demands appeared on page 3. That page was replaced by a page of advertisements. These events led journalists to hold a one-day strike on 11 September.Reporters Without Borders reaffirms its support for editorial independence of public media, and for transparency in the appointment of their executives. The organization deplores official meddling with public media operations, and the grave consequences that interference can set in motion.The events at Dar Essabah underline the urgent need for creation of a independent body to guarantee the independence and pluralism of public media, and authorized to settle conflicts and head off crises. Forum on Information and Democracy 250 recommendations on how to stop “infodemics” Tunisia : RSF asks Tunisian president’s office to respect journalists News December 26, 2019 Find out more November 11, 2020 Find out more News Help by sharing this information Newslast_img read more

Radio Nova contributor is free

first_img RSF_en Follow the news on Colombia ColombiaAmericas 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies October 21, 2020 Find out more A stringer for the French station Radio Nova, Julien Fouchet, has been released by a paramilitary group that was holding him, a French diplomatic source said in Bogotá on 27 February. French embassy spokesman Frank Técourt said that Fouchet, who disappeared in the Sierra Nevada on 15 January 2004, had been held by a paramilitary group that wanted “to determine exactly what he was doing there”. Fouchet, a student of law in the Colombian capital, was in good health, he added. News May 13, 2021 Find out more ColombiaAmericas News February 28, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Radio Nova contributor is free to go further Organisation Help by sharing this information A stringer for the French station Radio Nova, Julien Fouchet, has been released by a paramilitary group that was holding him, a French diplomatic source said in Bogotá on 27 February. French embassy spokesman Frank Técourt said that Fouchet, who disappeared in the Sierra Nevada on 15 January 2004, had been held by a paramilitary group that wanted “to determine exactly what he was doing there”. Fouchet, a student of law in the Colombian capital, was in good health, he added._____Reporters Without Borders voiced concern today about the fate of Julien Fouchet, 27, a French law student in Bogota and freelance contributor to Radio Nova, whose disappearance in northern Colombia more than a month ago was officially confirmed by the French embassy in Bogota yesterday.The organisation urged the Colombian authorities to do everything possible to find him.There has been no word of Fouchet since he went missing in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta on 15 January. Located near the Caribbean coast 1,000 km north of the capital, this mountain range boasts indigenous archeological sites but is also the refuge of armed groups and drug traffickers.Agence France-Presse said Fouchet wanted to make contact with the guerrillas of the National Liberation Army (ELN) in the Sierra Nevada. About 80 journalists have been kidnapped or detained by Colombia’s two main guerrilla groups, the ELN and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), since 1997. It was the ELN that kidnapped two journalists – one American and one British – in January 2003.Fouchet’s parents have gone to Colombia to seek more information about the circumstances of his disappearance. News RSF, IFEX-ALC and Media Defence, support FLIP and journalist Diana Díaz against state harassment in Colombia Receive email alerts April 27, 2021 Find out more Reports RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin Americalast_img read more