LNRCS Signs US$700,000 Agreement

first_imgThe Liberian National Red Cross Society (LNRCS) has signed a cooperative framework (CFW) agreement with the International Committee of the Red Cross. It is intended to provide support in the amount of over US$700,000 to help the entity carry out its work for 2014.LNRCS has indicated the funds are intended to help it adequately drive a five-year strategic plan recently drafted by the national society for rapid humanitarian response to promote timely humanitarian services throughout the country. The CFW agreement is an annual contract focusing ICRC financial and technical support to the Liberian Red Cross’ program implementation and core cost.The agreement is expected to be concentrated in five strategic areas the LNRCS has earmarked, including: Organizational Development, Disaster Management, Communication, Restoring Family Links and Community Based Health.The president of LNRCS, Mr. Emmanuel Kparh, signed on behalf of his entity, while the head of delegate of the International Committee of the Red Cross, Jean Jerome, signed on behalf of his organizationMr. Kparh, at the signing ceremony said the Liberian Red Cross appreciates the existing partnership with the ICRC. He stated the agreement would enable the LNRCS to address pressing challenges to help alleviate human suffering.Mr. Kparh termed the agreement a significant step in the LNRCS’s plans to consolidate gains of the past years in providing quality and timely services to vulnerable people and communities in an effective and efficient manner.“Since 2007, we have formed a partnership with the ICRC that better positioned us to address Liberia’s many humanitarian challenges. With this agreement, the LNRCS and the ICRC have committed themselves to continue cooperation and have decided to base this on an overall cooperation framework agreement,” Mr. Kparh noted.The LNRCS president furthered that he strongly believes the aim of the cooperation is not only limited to implementing LNRCS-ICRC joint projects, capacity building, provision of financial aids and technical supports, but to ensure that mutual respect, information sharing and trust become its hallmark.The head delegate of the International Committee of the Red Cross, Jean Jerome, acknowledged the partnership with the Liberian Red Cross and renewed the ICRC’s commitment to supporting the LNRCS in its humanitarian interventions.Mr. Jerome noted that there is a lot of work to do for the vulnerable and underprivileged people who suffer the worst during natural and human made crises. The ICRC delegation boss detailed that the content of the agreement was discussed since July in line with the situation in Liberia.With the latest signing of the agreement, the Liberian Red Cross would be strengthened to maximize its output to vulnerable people and communities through its programs implementation.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Arsenal fined over Leicester ref rage

first_img0Shares0000Furious Arsenal players surround referee Graham Scott © AFP / Lindsey PARNABYLONDON, United Kingdom, May 22 – Arsenal were fined Sh2.7mn (£20,000) by the Football Association on Tuesday for their players’ protests during a 3-1 defeat at Leicester.Gunners players were left incensed after referee Graham Scott gave Leicester a 75th-minute spot-kick for a foul by Henrikh Mkhitaryan on Demarai Gray at the King Power Stadium. Jamie Vardy converted the penalty to put Leicester 2-1 up and on course for victory in Arsenal’s penultimate game of the Premier League season on May 9.“Arsenal have been fined £20,000 after failing to ensure their players conducted themselves in an orderly fashion during the 75th minute against Leicester City on 9 May 2018,” an FA statement announced.“Arsenal admitted the charge but did not accept the standard penalty. An Independent Regulatory Commission subsequently ruled that the circumstances were not truly exceptional and the fine was applied.”Leicester’s first league win over Arsenal since 1994 came in Arsene Wenger’s second last game in charge of the Gunners.It was Arsenal’s seventh consecutive top-flight away defeat and Wenger, speaking after the match, said: “It’s a creative, imaginative aspect from the referee. We watched it again, it’s a nice dive but it’s not a penalty.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Liverpool and Tottenham summer signings must start in what could be crucial games this week

first_img1 Danny Ings Stephen Tudor of TheDaisyCutter.co.uk explains why England’s final Euro qualifiers, despite being ‘dead rubbers’, could be vital for the national team.With England’s passage to next summer’s European Championship secured, Roy Hodgson must be sorely tempted to utilise the full depth of his squad against Estonia and Lithuania this week and introduce his newest recruits to the pressure and demands of international football.It is an opportunity he would be remiss to pass up.Even with eight months to go before the tournament gets underway, it is possible to predict Hodgson’s starting XI and he is deserving of credit for successfully balancing a qualifying campaign with establishing a system familiar to and favoured by his key personnel.That however does not take into account the inevitable loss of form from some and injuries to others that will surely occur between now and June 2016.The expected presence of Joe Hart between the sticks at Wembley this Friday evening is a prime example of the England manager’s tendency to over-rely on an individual, a strategy that could ultimately prove costly.The Manchester City stopper has been in fine form this season and once again showed his class in City’s recent Champions League win in Monchengladbach. He is clearly head and shoulders above his rivals for the number one jersey and a guaranteed starter in France.Yet in the thousands of hours of top level football Hart will play between now and then it is perfectly conceivable he will succumb to injury and that wholly unwelcome scenario would present a further sting in the tail.The queue to replace him is worryingly short and even collectively there is a dearth of experience. The most likely stand-in, Stoke City’s Jack Butland, presently boasts only 45 minutes of full international duty and it would be far from ideal to throw the 22 year old into a major tournament with only that under his belt.Granted there will be friendlies for Roy to assess those on the fringes – most notably against Spain and France next month – but what this weekend affords competitive fixtures that amount to nothing to lose but pride. For any manager looking to experiment that‘s the best of both worlds and at the risk of hubris it also helps that they are eminently winnable. This then surely represents the perfect opportunity to blood debutants Danny Ings and the exciting Dele Alli, while offering a further chance for Butland, Shelvey and Vardy to find their feet on the international stage.Whereas if Hart, Milner and Sterling start against Estonia it will achieve little more than telling us things we already know while sticking an extra cap in their cabinets.With our passport to France attained now is the time to begin preparations and first and foremost that means strengthening the peripheries of a squad that might well be stretched come June.Success in any tournament always comes at a price. It’s time for Roy to start saving up for the unexpected.To read more from Stephen Tudor, follow @TheDaisyCutter1 on Twitterlast_img read more

GAA NEWS: NAOMH ULTAN NARROWLY DEFEATED BY NA ROSSA

first_imgNaomh Ultan GAA NotesRoyal Flush Lotto – Royal Flush results for the weekend of the 08/06/2014 were 1, 4, 10 & 20. There was no winner of the jackpot worth €3320. Consolation prizes went to JF Shovlin, Daniel Gallagher, Cavan & Ethan Shovlin. Next week’s jackpot now stands at €3340 and the draw will take place in Macs Bar. 40th Anniversary Celebrations –A provisional date of Saturday August 9th has been set for the club’s 40th anniversary celebrations. Confirmation of this date will be decided soon. A meeting will take place next Thursday, June 12th at 8pm upstairs in the clubhouse. Anyone willing to get involved in the organisation of the event please attend.2014 Kelloggs Cúl Camp –The Naomh Ultan GAA annual Cúl Camp will take place this year from Monday 30th June to Friday the 4th of July at the pitch in Dunkineely. The camp will run daily from 10am to 2:30pm and will cater for children from ages 6-13. Parents can register their child prior to the camp on http://www.kelloggsculcamps.gaa.ie/ or can pay on the first morning of the camp. More information and prices can be found on the website. Contact camp co-ordinator Dermot Gallier on 0879946654 with any other queries.Adult Football –Our seniors had a very disappointing one point loss to Na Rossa in Dooey last Saturday. They will now look to get their league form back on track when they make the long journey to Moville next Saturday. Throw in times 6pm (senior) and 7:30pm (reserve).GAA NEWS: NAOMH ULTAN NARROWLY DEFEATED BY NA ROSSA was last modified: June 9th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:GAANaomh UltanNoticesSportlast_img read more

Saddam faces first witness testimony in trial

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) – A combative Saddam Hussein lashed out Monday at his treatment by American “occupiers and invaders” and lectured the chief judge about leadership as his trial resumed in a rambling and unfocused session. Two of the seven other defendants also spoke out during the 2 1/2-hour hearing, complaining of their treatment in detention or dissatisfaction with their court-appointed counsel. Former U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark, who has joined the defense team as an advisor, said it was “extremely difficult” to assure fairness in the trial “because the passions in the country are at a fever pitch.” “How can you ask a witness to come in when there’s a death threat?” Clark told CNN. “Unless there’s protection for the defense, I don’t know how the trial can go forward.” The tribunal adjourned until Dec. 5, only 10 days before the country’s parliamentary elections, to give the defense time to replace lawyers who have been assassinated since the trial opened Oct. 19. Monday was the trial’s second session. The court’s tolerance of vocal complaints from the defendants drew sharp criticism from Shiite politicians who contend the tribunal is trying too hard to accommodate an ousted dictator who should have already been convicted and executed. “The chief judge should be changed and replaced by someone who is strict and courageous,” said Shiite legislator Ali al-Adeeb, a senior official in Prime Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari’s party. Saddam, immaculately groomed and the only defendant wearing Western clothes, moved quickly to try to seize control of the proceedings at the heavily guarded Baghdad court. Dressed in black trousers and a gray jacket with a white handkerchief in the breast pocket, the 68-year-old former president was the last defendant to enter the chamber. While other defendants appeared frightened and exhausted, Saddam swaggered confidently to his seat, greeting people along the way with the traditional Arabic greeting, “Peace be upon the people of peace” as he cradled a copy of the Quran. Saddam began with a verse from the Muslim holy book that reminds believers who aspire for heaven that God knows who actually participated in jihad, or holy war. He then complained that he had to walk up four flights of stairs in shackles and accompanied by “foreign guards” because the elevator was not working. The chief judge, Rizgar Mohammed Amin, said he would tell the police not to let that happen again. “You are the chief judge,” Saddam snapped back, speaking like a president to a subordinate. “I don’t want you to tell them. I want you to order them. They are in our country. You have the sovereignty. You are Iraqi and they are foreigners and occupiers. They are invaders. You should order them.” Saddam also complained that some of his papers had been taken from him. “How can a defendant defend himself if his pen was taken? Saddam Hussein’s pen and papers were taken. I don’t mean a white paper. There are papers downstairs that include my remarks in which I express my opinion,” he said. Amin ordered bailiffs to give Saddam pen and paper. The tribunal allowed Clark and prominent lawyers from Qatar and Jordan to joined the defense team as advisers, a move aimed at convincing foreign human rights groups that the trial would meet international standards of fairness. Also, the chief judge ordered all handcuffs and shackles removed from the defendants before they entered the courtroom – another gesture toward the accused. The defendants stand accused of killing more than 140 Shiite Muslims after an assassination attempt against Saddam in the Shiite town of Dujail in 1982. Convictions could bring a sentence of death by hanging. None of the nearly 35 prosecution witnesses testified Monday, but the prosecution entered into evidence two videotapes – one shot in the aftermath of the assassination attempt showing Saddam in military uniform interrogating three villagers. The second was a videotaped statement by former intelligence officer Wadah Israel al-Sheik made last month shortly before he died of cancer. Amin read the transcript as the tape played without sound. According to the transcript, al-Sheik, who appeared frail and sat in a wheelchair in a U.S.-controlled hospital, said about 400 people were detained after the assassination attempt, although he estimated only seven to 12 gunmen actively participated in the ambush of Saddam’s convoy. “I don’t know why so many people were arrested,” al-Sheik said, adding that co-defendant Barazan Ibrahim, Saddam’s half brother and head of Iraqi intelligence at the time, “was the one directly giving the orders.” A day after the assassination attempt, whole families were rounded up and taken to Abu Ghraib prison, he said. Al-Sheik noted that co-defendant Taha Yassin Ramadan, a former vice president, headed a committee that ordered orchards – the basis of Dujail’s livelihood – to be destroyed because they were used to conceal the assailants. At the end of the session, Saddam’s half brother and fellow defendant, Barazan Ibrahim, complained he had not received proper medical treatment since being diagnosed with cancer and that this amounted to “indirect murder.” Defendant Awad al-Bandar claimed he and Saddam had been threatened in court last month. The judge told him to submit his complaints in writing. Amin then adjourned the hearing until next Monday. Saddam’s personal attorney, Khalil al-Dulaimi, complained the defense needed at least a month. Amin suspended the hearing for 10 minutes to confer with the four other judges and then announced that the Monday date was firm. The slow pace of the proceedings has angered many Iraqis – especially majority Shiites – who believe Saddam should have already been punished for his alleged crimes. Shiites and Kurds were heavily oppressed by Saddam’s Sunni Arab-dominated regime. “Iraqis are beginning to feel frustrated,” said Ridha Jawad Taki, a senior official in the country’s biggest Shiite party. “The court should be more active. Saddam was captured two years ago. … The weakness of this court might affect the verdicts, and this is worrying us.” However, Clark and others argue that a fair trial is impossible in Iraq because of the insurgency and because the country is effectively under foreign military occupation, despite U.S. and Iraqi assurances that the trial will conform to international standards. Clark, who was attorney general under President Lyndon B. Johnson, is a staunch anti-war advocate who met with Saddam days before the 2003 invasion. He has also consulted several times with one-time Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, who is on trial in The Hague, Netherlands, on war crimes charges. Saddam’s trial has unleashed passions at a time of rising tensions between the country’s Shiite and Sunni communities. Government security services are dominated by Shiites and Kurds, while Sunni Arabs form the backbone of the insurgency. In Baghdad, Shiite businessman Saadoun Abdul-Hassan stayed home Monday to watch the trial on television but expressed disappointment over the pace. “Saddam does not need witnesses or evidence. The mass graves are the biggest witness and he should be executed in order for the security situation to improve,” he said. In Saddam’s hometown of Tikrit, however, merchant Adnan Barzan called Saddam the “legitimate president” of Iraq and said that “those who speak about mass graves and about Dujail should go see what the new government is doing.” “They will find real mass graves dug by this government and not by the government of Saddam Hussein,” Barzan said. Associated Press reporters Qassim Abdul-Zahra, Bassem Mroue and Sameer N. Yacoub also contributed to this report.last_img read more

Local Elections 2019: Martin McDermott ‘blown away’ with massive vote

first_imgNorth Inishowen: Martin McDermott says he’s ‘blown away’ by the strength of his support with tally figures showing the Glengad man with a landslide in North Inishowen.Tally figures show that Fianna Fáil Councillor McDermott has taken a whopping 34.5 per cent of the vote.McDermott has 2,376 first preferences, meaning he is well in excelss of the 1,377 quota. “I’m absolutely delighted. It’s a blown-away vote,” McDermott told Donegal Daily.“I can’t put into words the support I’ve got. I got great support the last time. To get around 35 per cent of the vote, I can’t put that into words.”McDermott was first elected to Donegal County Council five years ago, when he had 2,002 first preferences.He said: “It’s not the big issues. It’s the small, everyday issues. Those are the things that get you elected and the things that mean the most to people. “You have to do the work on the ground. People see what goes on and see what you do. I love doing what I do.“I try to help as many people as I can. I’ll do that for the next five years. That’s what I’m there to do.If you do the work, you get the rewards. I have a very close-knit community who stand behind me.”Labour’s Martin Farren (1,263) and Sinn Féin’s Albert Doherty (1,110) will also retain their seats in Lifford.Fine Gael Councillor Bernard McGuinness (954) is in a battle with another Final Fáil candidate, Marie Duffy, for the fourth seat in North Inishowen. McDermott’s transfers could be defining in deciding who takes that fourth seat. FOLLOW OUR LIVE BLOG FROM THE 2019 DONEGAL LOCAL ELECTIONS BELOW …LIVE: Donegal Daily Local Elections 2019 – follow our updatesLocal Elections 2019: Martin McDermott ‘blown away’ with massive vote was last modified: May 25th, 2019 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Bernard McGuinnessfianna failFine Gaellocal elections 2019Marie DuffyMartin FarrenMartin McDermottNorth Inishowenlast_img read more

Gift that keeps on giving

first_imgTo teach a child to read is to equip her with the tools for success in life.(Image: help2read)Lorraine KearneyLiteracy is key: if you can read, you can make something of yourself.“Literacy can break the cycle of poverty,” stresses Marco Andolfi, the business development manager of Cape Town-based non-profit Section 21 company help2read.The flipside is that if you cannot read, you are trapped – unemployed and unemployable, or stuck in a low-paid, unskilled job.With this in mind, help2read has designed a model that targets primary school children in under-resourced schools.“help2read is an organisation set up to promote child literacy across South Africa,” Andolfi explains. “We recruit and train local volunteers to help children in primary schools – mostly in grade three – to learn to read.”There are approximately five-million illiterate people in South Africa. And schools are not necessarily helping to lower this number: according to the 2006 Pirls report, South African schoolchildren are three to five years behind their international counterparts.Pirls, the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study, is run by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement, an independent, international cooperative of national research institutions and governmental research agencies. First conducted in 2001, Pirls reports every five years on the reading achievement of fourth grade children worldwide.“The problem is that most South African children come from a culture of non-reading,” says Andolfi, “and this is added to poorly resourced schools.”There are no books at home; children don’t see or listen to their parents reading; they are seldom, if ever, taken to a library; their schools frequently do not have libraries.How it workshelp2read places volunteers, each armed with a well-stocked book box, into participating schools. There are coordinator teachers at these schools who identify the pupils most in need. The volunteers then work one-on-one with these children, 30 minutes a week, for a year.In total, each volunteer spends two hours a week at their school. The long-term nature of the intervention helps to build strong relationships of trust between the child and the volunteer, as well as build the child’s self-confidence.“We have 686 volunteers working in our schools in Western Cape and Gauteng. It is unpaid work, and many of them are unemployed. It’s also a skills development project. We hold regular workshops for our volunteers, and they learn skills that will help them in finding work.”Some volunteers are employed and come in before work; others are retired people. Each volunteer is strictly vetted, with proper police clearances carried out, before they are trained. Only once this is done are they placed in schools.Of the volunteers, 52% are unemployed and live in disadvantaged areas. They often volunteer as a means of participating in meaningful activities that enhance their own skills and self-esteem. Women make up 93% of the volunteers.It seems to be working. “In 2011 we had assessments that found that after six months on our programme, learning improved by 14 months.” This brings the children up to speed.Although this school outreach is the core of help2read’s work, it also has other projects to promote literacy, such as Reading Adventures, which run at local libraries.“We use puppet shows and other activities to spread the love for reading. We are also now undertaking a youth librarian training project together with Equal Education.”Such partnerships are an engine of growth, Andolfi says, emphasising that there is room for more, particularly with the education ministry. It has also recently expanded into Namibia, teaming up with the Michelle McLean Children Trust. Numbers are growinghelp2Read started as a pilot project in 2005 at Muizenberg Primary School, on the Cape Peninsula. It now works in about 90 schools in the Western Cape, with about 1 250 children. It also expanded into Gauteng in 2011, where it works in 15 schools and helps 250 pupils.“In the long run, our major goal is to be in rural areas, especially in Limpopo, Mpumalanga and Eastern Cape [where the need is greatest],” says Andolfi. “We must create skills in the areas where people live so that they can make a life there, and are not forced to migrate.”The mission, according to the group, is to “motivate the literate adult population in South Africa to pass on their skills to the next generation, helping children to become confident readers. The key to the future of help2read is the recruitment and development of volunteers from underprivileged communities”.Andolfi explains: “We try to train people to help themselves.” He points out that help2read is not a charity but is a developmental organisation. It’s the old story of teaching a person to fish rather than giving him a fish.Of course, the need is great. Volunteers and cash are constantly in demand. Corporates can help through donations, and individuals can also make donations – for just R100 a month, for example, you can sponsor a child to learn to read for a year. For R25 000, a company can sponsor an entire school.Donations and sponsorships are also used to get books. They come from publishing houses, which donate or give an NGO discount; through the US group Books for Africa; and from individuals.Books used in the programme are age-appropriate and in line with school requirements. Donated books that don’t fit this profile are sold back to the public. The cash raised through these book sales and other fundraising activities is poured right back into the literacy programme.The organisation is holding its annual fundraising dinner in Cape Town on 20 November.Description: Help2read works in schoolsMetatags: help2read, read, education, literacy, illiterate, volunteer, school, library, learner, book, MediaClub, Play Your Part, Brand South Africa, Brand SA, official siteGift that keeps on givingTeaching a child to read is a priceless gift. The world opens when you can read, and your prospects improve – a better job, a better life. The help2read organisation gives this gift to South African children.Lorraine KearneyLiteracy is key: if you can read, you can make something of yourself. “Literacy can break the cycle of poverty,” stresses Marco Andolfi, the business development manager of Cape Town-based non-profit Section 21 company help2read. The flipside is that if you cannot read, you are trapped – unemployed and unemployable, or stuck in a low-paid, unskilled job.With this in mind, help2read has designed a model that targets primary school children in under-resourced schools. “help2read is an organisation set up to promote child literacy across South Africa,” Andolfi explains. “We recruit and train local volunteers to help children in primary schools – mostly in grade three – to learn to read.”There are approximately five-million illiterate people in South Africa. And schools are not necessarily helping to lower these rates: according to the 2006 Pirls report, South African schoolchildren are three to five years behind their international counterparts. Pirls, the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study, is run by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement, an independent, international cooperative of national research institutions and governmental research agencies. First conducted in 2001, Pirls reports every five years on the reading achievement of fourth grade children worldwide.“The problem is that most South African children come from a culture of non-reading,” says Andolfi, “and this is added to poorly resourced schools.” There are no books at home; they don’t see or listen to their parents reading; they are not often, if ever, taken to a library; their schools frequently do not have libraries.How it workshelp2read places volunteers, each armed with a well-stocked book box, into participating schools. There are coordinator teachers at these schools who identify the pupils most in need. The volunteers then work one-on-one with these children, 30 minutes a week, for a year. In total, each volunteer spends two hours a week at their school. The long-term nature of the intervention helps to build strong relationships of trust between the child and the volunteer, as well as build the child’s self-confidence.“We have 686 volunteers working in our schools in Western Cape and Gauteng. It is unpaid work, and many of them are unemployed. It’s also a skills development project. We hold regular workshops for our volunteers, and they learn skills that will help them in finding work.”Some volunteers are employed and come in before work; others are retired people. Each volunteer is strictly vetted, with proper police clearances carried out, before they are trained. Only once this is done are they placed in schools. Of the volunteers, 52% are unemployed and live in disadvantaged areas. They often volunteer as a means of participating in meaningful activities that enhance their own skills and self-esteem. Women make up 93% of the volunteers.It seems to be working. “In 2011 we had assessments that found that after six months on our programme, learning improved by 14 months.” This brings the children up to speed.Although this school outreach is the core of help2read’s work, it also has other projects to promote literacy, such as Reading Adventures, which run at local libraries. “We use puppet shows and other activities to spread the love for reading. We are also now undertaking a youth librarian training project together with Equal Education.” Such partnerships are an engine of growth, Andolfi says, emphasising that there is room for more, particularly with the education ministry. It has also recently expanded into Namibia, teaming up with the Michelle McLean Children Trust.Numbers are growinghelp2Read started as a pilot project in 2005 at Muizenberg Primary School, on the Cape Peninsula. It now works in about 90 schools in the Western Cape, with about 1 250 children. It also expanded into Gauteng in 2011, where it works in 15 schools and helps 250 pupils. “In the long run, our major goal is to be in rural areas, especially in Limpopo, Mpumalanga and Eastern Cape [where the need is greatest],” says Andolfi. “We must create skills in the areas where people live so that they can make a life there, and are not forced to migrate.”The mission, according to the group, is to “motivate the literate adult population in South Africa to pass on their skills to the next generation, helping children to become confident readers. The key to the future of help2read is the recruitment and development of volunteers from underprivileged communities”.Andolfi explains: “We try to train people to help themselves.” He points out that help2read is not a charity but is a developmental organisation. It’s the old story of teaching a person to fish rather than giving him a fish.Of course, the need is great. Volunteers and cash are constantly in demand. Corporates can help through donations, and individuals can also make donations – for just R100 a month, for example, you can sponsor a child to learn to read for a year. For R25 000, a company can sponsor an entire school. Donations and sponsorships are also used to get books. They come from publishing houses, which donate or give an NGO discount; through the US group Books for Africa; and from individuals. Books used in the programme are age-appropriate and in line with school requirements. Donated books that don’t fit this profile are sold back to the public. The cash raised through these book sales and other fundraising activities is poured right back into the literacy programme.The organisation is holding its annual fundraising dinner in Cape Town on 20 November.Contact:Marco Andolfi, business development managerTel: +27 (0)21 685 8085Fax: +27 (0)86 511 2399last_img read more

The board of Brand South Africa pay respect to Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela

first_imgJohannesburg, Monday 9 December 2013 – Brand South Africa board members today visited the family of former President Mandela in Houghton, to express their support following the passing of Tata Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela.Speaking from Houghton Johannesburg, Brand South Africa Chairperson Chichi Maponya Chairperson said, “We must remember the great work that Tata Madiba has done for South Africa. It is our duty as citizens to play our part through living his legacy by our positive actions. Madiba was a great, fearless and compassionate leader whose resilience and charisma made an impact on millions throughout his life.”“He cannot be replaced in person but his legacy of selfless and principled dedication to equality and justice lives on in South Africa. We stand together with the millions of fellow South Africans and friends around the world as we use this time to reflect and recommit ourselves to the values and practices he stood for.”“This is a trying time for the nation, the world and especially the Mandela family. As we pay our last respects to our former president, we also express our deepest gratitude to the Mandela family for allowing us the opportunity and sharing with us as the Nation their greatest jewel,” concluded Ms Maponya.Note to editors Text of President Zuma’s official statement on the passing of Former President Nelson Mandela: http://www.thepresidency.gov.za/index.htm Official dedicated Mandela website: http://www.mandela.gov.za/ About Brand South AfricaBrand South Africa is the official marketing agency of South Africa, with a mandate to build the country’s brand reputation, in order to improve its global competitiveness abroad. Its aim is also to build pride and patriotism among South Africans, in order to contribute to social cohesion and nation brand ambassadorship. Further resources from Brand South AfricaMedia are invited to visit http://www.southafrica.info/ for further resources which can be reproduced without any copyright infringement.  Kindly attribute to Brand South Africa. Follow Brand South Africa@Brand_SA (https://twitter.com/Brand_SA) Tell us how you Play Your Parthttp://www.playyourpart.co.za/tellus-someone@PlayyourpartSA#DoBest   For more information or to set up interviews, please contact:Arahna SinghBrand South Africa CommunicationsTel: +27 11 712 5061 Mobile: +27 (0) 82 491 2332Email: arahnas@brandsouthafrica.comVisit:   www.brandsouthafrica.comEndslast_img read more

Sub-Saharan Africa’s middle class set to boom

first_img21 August 2014While Africa’s middle class may be smaller than the oft-reported figure of 300-million, it is growing at a strong rate – and the broad-based income growth is likely to encourage more companies to invest in the region, according to a report released by Standard Bank this week.There are 15-million middle-class households in 11 of sub-Saharan Africa’s top economies this year, up from 4.6-million in 2000 and 2.4-million in 1990, the report states. This represents an increase of 230% over 14 years.The report, titled “Understanding Africa’s middle class”, found that the combined GDPs of the 11 measured economies – Angola, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Nigeria, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia – had grown tenfold since 2000.DiscrepanciesIncome discrepancies, however, are vast among the 11 economies, with almost 86% of the 110-million households falling within the low-income band. This is expected to fall to around 75% by 2030.“While the scale of Africa’s middle-class ascent has, we believe, been somewhat exaggerated in line with the at times breathless ‘Africa Rising’ narrative, there is still plenty of scope for measured optimism regarding the size of the middle class in several key Sub-Saharan Africa economies,” said Simon Freemantle, an economist at Standard Bank.The study used the Living Standards Measure (LSM), a South African methodology based on a wider range of analysis than income alone. Under the LSM, households with an annual consumption of under US$5 500 are classified in the low-income band, while households that consume between $5 500 and $42 000 a year are classified as lower-middle, middle, and upper-middle classes.OptimismFreemantle said there was cause for optimism among investors as the results suggest even greater scope for future growth. The number of middle-class households in the sub-Saharan African countries is likely to increase significantly in the next 15 years.“Including lower-middle-class households, the overall number swells to over 40-million households by 2030, from around 15-million today,” the report says.The 11 countries covered by the report account for half Africa’s total GDP (75% if South Africa is excluded) and half its population.The figure of 300-million middle-class Africans – one-third of Africa’s people – comes from a study by the African Development Bank in 2011, which defined “middle class” as earning between $4 and $20 a day.“Such individuals would still be exceptionally vulnerable to various economic shocks, and prone to lose their middle-income status,” Freemantle said.‘Consumer potential’The report found there was “an undeniable swelling” of Africa’s middle class, irrespective of which methodology was used.“Reliable and proven data should if anything spur more interest in the continent’s consumer potential by adding depth to what was previously conjecture,” said Freemantle.As a caution, the report states: “Though there has been a meaningful individual lift in income, it is clear that a substantial majority of individuals in most countries we looked at still live on or below the poverty line (measured as those with a daily income of USD2 or less).”SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

The Hustler’s Playbook: Success Is a By-Product

first_imgYou can’t “be successful.” You can only do the things that produce success.Hustlers are successful because they do certain things of which success is a byproduct.Future-OrientationHustler’s are future-oriented. They don’t allow their past to define their future. For a hustler, their past is just an origin story. Hustlers trade time and energy now for the future they want.Success is what happens when you take the actions that build a better future.Go All InHustlers succeed because they don’t take half measures. They’re all in. If they are going to do something, they become obsessed with that thing. They allow their vision to consume them.Success is what happens when you take massive action in pursuit of some goal or ambition.Grind It OutHustlers love the grind. A non-hustler hates Mondays and can’t wait for Friday. They call driving to the office and doing their job “the grind.” But hustlers define “grind” very differently. To a hustler, grinding means relentlessly doing the work that most needs to be done, and that which leads to the best results.Success is the by-product of hard work. It’s also the result of working smarter.Grow Big EnoughHustlers are growth-oriented, personally and professionally. Hustlers work on developing the only real asset they have for producing the results they want: themselves. Hustlers don’t allow failure or setbacks to dissuade them. Instead, they use it to make adjustments.Success often follows failure. Failure is your teacher, giving you the feedback on what you need to learn before your next attempt.Do What Is UncomfortableHustlers don’t avoid the things that cause non-hustlers to run for the doors. Hustlers are comfortable with conflict, engaging in the difficult conversations that are necessary to getting things done. Hustlers are also comfortable selling themselves and their ideas, in part because they’re obsession is the passion that infects others.Success is what happens when you do the things that make you uncomfortable until they no longer make you uncomfortable.Outcomes Are the By-ProductWhat about the money? Hustlers do make money, even if their real goal is something greater, like freedom. But money is only a by-product of creating value for other people. Unless you inherit money, the money you make has to come from someone else who is willing to exchange it for something you have.Success is a naturally occurring outcome of a set of beliefs and actions. The beliefs and actions that hustlers consistently take are what produces the success. Don’t confuse the by-product with the hard work and sacrifice it takes to produce it. Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Nowlast_img read more