Video: Draymond Green Says If He Could Hit Someone With A Snowball, It’d Be A Michigan Fan

first_imgDraymond Green being interviewed.draymond green snowball michigan fanThursday, Nike released a new two-minute commercial dedicated to “Snow Days” which features over a dozen of the brand’s professional athletes lining up against each other on the football field. One of those athletes is former Michigan State star Draymond Green, who now plays for the Golden State Warriors.Nike also released a “Behind The Scenes” look at the commercial, and asked a few of the athletes who they’d hit with a snowball, given the chance. Green’s answer? A University of Michigan fan. Check it out:This isn’t the first time Green has expressed his dislike for the Wolverines. If you’re interested, here’s the actual commercial – it’s actually very cool.last_img

Maryland Announces New Head Coaching Hire

first_imgA general view of Maryland's football stadium.COLLEGE PARK, MD – NOVEMBER 03: A general view of the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets and Maryland Terrapins game at Byrd Stadium on November 3, 2012 in College Park, Maryland. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)Another head coaching vacancy has been filled.After a tumultuous 2018 college football season, Maryland has finally found its new head coach. Former Maryland assistant and interim head coach Mike Locksley – currently offensive coordinator for Alabama – is headed back home.Maryland took to Twitter to make the news official.Welcome Home!We are excited to announce Michael Locksley as the head coach of Maryland Football. #LOCKedIn ? | #FearTheTurtlehttps://t.co/7ysnt51mQz pic.twitter.com/CLeCcqVDuC— Maryland Football (@TerpsFootball) December 5, 2018Matt Canada, who entered the season as the offensive coordinator at Maryland, assumed head coaching duties after the school placed DJ Durkin on leave. He took over as  the interim head coach when Durkin was fired as well.Despite his close proximity to the program, Canada did not get the “interim” status removed from his title.Locksley formerly coached at New Mexico where he racked up a rough 2-26 record. After his stint there, Locksley took over as the offensive coordinator at Maryland and then served as the team’s interim head coach for six games – going 1-5.Now there’s an opening on Nick Saban’s staff.last_img read more

There Are 4 Bowl Games Today – Here’s The Schedule

first_imgGeneric photo of footballs in an end zone.(Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)The college football bowl season rolls on today with a handful of solid contests. Four match-ups highlight the action today including a few teams that are hoping to finish the season in the top-25 – Army has a shot at the polls with a win today.No ranked programs are in action, but there’s still plenty to look forward to. Here is the four-game schedule coming up Saturday afternoon and night:Jared Birmingham Bowl: Memphis vs. Wake Forest at 12:00 p.m. ET on ESPNLockheed Martin Armed Forces Bowl: Houston vs. Army at 3:30 p.m. ET on ESPNDollar General Bowl: Buffalo vs. Troy at 7:00 p.m. ET on ESPNSofi Hawaii Bowl: Hawaii vs. Louisiana Tech at 10:30 p.m. ET on ESPNThe late college football games today will be up against two NFL games as the Tennessee Titans face off against the Washington Redskins and the Los Angeles Chargers face off against the Baltimore Ravens.There’s plenty to watch this weekend.last_img read more

Nebraska Students To Vote On Football Balloon Tradition

first_imgNebraska football's game day balloon release.LINCOLN, NE – AUGUST 31: Nebraska fans release red balloons after the Nebraska Cornhuskers score their first points of the game against the Wyoming Cowboys at Memorial Stadium on August 31, 2013 in Lincoln, Nebraska. (Photo by Eric Francis/Getty Images)Nebraska football has a long-held tradition of releasing red balloons into the air, following the Huskers’ first touchdown during games at Memorial Stadium. While many Husker fans love the tradition, a number of groups have raised concerns about the environmental impact.In 2014, an environmentalist unsuccessfully petitioned the school to end the tradition. A few years later, a lawsuit was raised, but ultimately thrown out in court.Through this fall, the balloons continue to fly. However, the tradition was brought into the spotlight once again last November.A marine biologist found a Huskers balloon, still inflated, on the coast of East Hampton, New York on Long Island.The local alumni association said that it does not release balloons, but speculated that it might have been local fans. It does seem unlikely that the balloon flew all the way from Lincoln.It still once again brought the tradition to the forefront, as those concerned about the environment push for the school to change it.Now, Nebraska-Lincoln students have the chance to vote on the balloon release tradition.The vote is non-binding, but the results will go to the athletic department. From The Daily Nebraskan:Government Bill 26 moves to add a question to the spring general election ballot to survey the student body about eliminating the balloon release at football games. The ballot item would only pose the question to collect students’ opinions and is not binding.Currently, Husker football fans release balloons after the first touchdown during home games at Memorial Stadium. The bill states people have pressured University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s administration to eliminate the tradition because of the environmental damage the balloons cause.If passed, students will answer whether they are against the balloon release, support the tradition or are indifferent to the issue.1011 Now in Lincoln spoke to a number of students who support continuing tradition, although it was short of a true sampling. Still, it will be interesting to see what the student body believes about this, given the environmental ramifications.[The Daily Nebraskan]last_img read more

Wife of former hostage Joshua Boyle back in US with children Report

first_imgOTTAWA – The American wife of former overseas hostage Joshua Boyle has reportedly left Canada and returned to the U.S. with the couple’s children, nearly six years after being abducted while backpacking in Afghanistan.Caitlan Coleman returned home to the U.S. on Monday with the three children, all of whom were born while she and Boyle were held for five years in captivity by a group with links to the Taliban, according to a report by ABC News.Boyle did not accompany his wife and children and remains in Canada awaiting trial after Ottawa police charged him in December with multiple offences, including assault, sexual assault, unlawful confinement and causing someone to take a noxious substance.The charges against Boyle relate to two alleged victims, but a court order prohibits the publication of any details that might identify them or any witnesses.None of the charges has been tested in court. The charges relate to incidents that allegedly occurred after the family was freed from captivity by Pakistani security forces and returned to Canada last October.Boyle was granted bail last month under strict conditions that include staying with his parents at their home in Smiths Falls, Ont., and wearing a GPS ankle bracelet to track his movements.Boyle and Coleman have been under the spotlight since they were taken hostage by a Taliban-linked group while on a backpacking trip in Afghanistan in 2012, when Coleman was five months pregnant.After being freed and returning to Canada, the family stayed for several weeks with Boyle’s parents in Smiths Falls, Ont. They then moved to Ottawa, where they had been living for about a month when Boyle was arrested.In his younger days, Boyle attended high school in Kitchener, Ont., and earned a degree from the University of Waterloo in 2005.He was briefly married to Zaynab Khadr, sister of Toronto-born Omar Khadr, who spent years in a U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, after being captured in Afghanistan.In 2011, Boyle married Coleman, who was raised in Pennsylvania, during a lengthy trip the pair took to South America.The following year, they set off for Russia and travelled through Central Asia for several months, winding up in Afghanistan.The family’s dramatic rescue last October made global headlines, and even led to a meeting on Parliament Hill with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.last_img read more

Starbucks to expand delivery in US China

first_imgNEW YORK — Starbucks is expanding delivery to more stores in the U.S. and China.The company says it will offer delivery from 2,000 U.S. stores by next summer through a partnership with UberEats. It isn’t yet saying which stores will offer it.In China, delivery will be offered from 2,000 stores in 30 cities by the end of this year, up from 150 stores at the end of September. Starbucks is partnering with delivery service Ele.me in that country.Starbucks made the comments at an investor presentation Thursday in New York.Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson says Starbucks has learned a lot about delivery since launching it in China in September. The company has special spill-proof cups, for example, and is making beverages hotter so they will be the right temperature to drink when they arrive.Dee-Ann Durbin, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Brock hosts Southern Ontario neuroscientists

Tyler Brown, graduate student from the University of Western Ontario, hangs a poster at the Southern Ontario Neuroscience Association annual meeting.About 140 neuroscientists and graduate students visited Brock on May 7 for the Southern Ontario Neuroscience Association (SONA) annual meeting.Participants from nine universities attended the one-day conference, which saw research talks, poster presentations and friendly socializing in Academic South.The event was a chance to promote Brock’s work in the field of neuroscience, said Stefan Brudzynski, a Brock Psychology professor cross-appointed to Biological Sciences, as well as president of SONA and chair of the event organizing committee.“It is good for Brock,” he said. “It emphasizes our role in local neuroscience and gives us an opportunity to present what we’re doing.”Three Brock graduate students gave talks at the conference, he said.Participating universities were: Brock University of Western Ontario University of Toronto University of Windsor Wilfred Laurier University Queen’s University University of Guelph University of WaterlooStephani Grella, graduate student from the University of Guelph, discusses her poster presentation with fellow Guelph student Jeff Franson. read more

Latin America faces huge task to reverse discrimination against Afrodescendants – UN

The top UN human rights official made those remarks in a speech to the first Meeting of Latin America and the Caribbean on the International Decade for People of African Descent (2015-2024) held in Brasilia, Brazil, last week and which bought together States, regional organizations, national human rights institutions, equality bodies and civil society, particularly those of people of African descent, as well as UN bodies from the region.“I am struck by the enormity of the task before us,” Mr. Zeid said. “Ten years to reverse five centuries of structural discrimination? Racial discrimination that has deep roots grown in colonialism and slavery and nourished daily with fear, poverty and violence, roots that aggressively infiltrate every aspect of life – from access to food and education to physical integrity, to participation in decisions that fundamentally affect one’s life,” he said.“A decade is such a short time,” he noted.Mr. Zeid called on States to honour their commitments and obligations under international human rights law and use all the tools at their disposal to make concrete progress in advancing the rights of Afro-descendants. The tools include international human rights treaties, the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action (DDPA) on eradicating racism and xenophobia, as well as the framework provided by the UN General Assembly for the International Decade. The themes for the Decade are: Recognition, Justice and Development. “Today, there are more than 150 million people of African descent in Latin America and the Caribbean – about 30 per cent of the population. Yet Afro-descendants throughout much of the region are almost invisible in the halls of power – economic, academic, professional or political, at local or national levels. High rates of inequality persist,” he said.At the end of the meeting on Friday, the delegates adopted a declaration which recalls the UN General Assembly’s Programme of Activities of the International Decade and reaffirms their commitment to the full implementation of the Durban Declaration at national, regional and global levels.States also pledged to adopt affirmative action policies to alleviate and remedy inequalities in the enjoyment of human rights in access to education and employment, in line with the particularities of each country.“Let us seize this chance to tap the untapped potential in hitherto invisible communities. Let us pledge to use these 10 years to turn a corner,” the High Commissioner said. read more

Waitrose rebrands its British ready meals which are made with meat from

first_imgLet’s test this. Describing a meat dish as ‘British lamb’ but making it from New Zealand lamb is…— Herdwick Shepherd (@herdyshepherd1) February 12, 2017 @waitrose can you explain this ?? British meals made with NewZealand #lambs 👿👿👿 #buybritish ?? pic.twitter.com/FOQXinBFMq— rattycastle (@rattycastle) February 12, 2017 Waitrose is to rebrand some of the ready meals in its “British” range because they use meat from New Zealand.The microwaveable meals will instead be labelled “Classic”, after criticism from consumers.The change will only affect recipes containing lamb, such as the Lamb Hotpot and Shepherd’s Pie. Products made from pork, beef and chicken will keep the “British” branding, as all the meat used in those comes from the UK. The problem was first noticed last year, at which stage stickers were places on the front of the packs to make it clearer that the lamb was from New Zealand.Now the supermarket chain is to go further with by rebranding the packaging.”We are about to re-launch the range with the branding “Classic”, removing the large ‘British’ reference from the front of pack,” a spokesman for the supermarket said. “This was only ever supposed to denote the origin of the recipe but we understand why confusion has arisen.” The supermarket is now looking into getting more British meat into its ready meals.The National Farmers Union (NFU) President Meurig Raymond told the BBC: “We made our concerns very clear to Waitrose right from the beginning on this product.”The inclusion of the word ‘British’ in the brand name despite the meat being sourced from New Zealand is misleading for shoppers – and it’s frustrating for British farmers, especially those who produce lamb Waitrose could have sourced.”center_img A farmer from the Lake District had started a poll on Twitter at the weekend asking whether the previous lamb labelling was acceptable or not.It attracted over 4,000 votes in 12 hours, with 97 per cent of respondents voting “Unacceptable (and a lie)”. @skier517 Hi Trish, ‘British’ is the name of the range of meals denoting the origin of the recipe. We understand why confusion has arisen.— Waitrose (@waitrose) February 13, 2017 Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more